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Thread: anyone else on lisinopril

  1. #21
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    HarryIrene has a reputation beyond reputeHarryIrene has a reputation beyond reputeHarryIrene has a reputation beyond reputeHarryIrene has a reputation beyond reputeHarryIrene has a reputation beyond reputeHarryIrene has a reputation beyond repute
    Yeah, I'm glad I found out when I did. I was a "Doctor Avoider" for a couple decades, felt great, never smoked, (just Herb & Hash years ago)Decent/Good shape. Sex drive and Temper was ready to go. I didn't need a geek, pin-head telling me to do stuff (Soft-toned voice: I'm a Rebel...Don't like following orders - ssshh)

    But, um, yeah - The Doctors eyes looked liked a Cartoon Character when he took my BP - He was like You gotta' get on something NOW!! As well as cholesterol meds really high. Just Genetics. The old Man had his 1st HA in his late 30's (Got ya' beat Dad - HAHA!!) He dropped dead at 53 on a Golf Course (didn't feel a thing) Whammo. I was 20. Sucks he never got to meet his Grand Kids. But he had been sick-Rough life of beating his body up. At least he died doing what he loved at the time and didn't feel a thing.

    Not to go off topic, but if your in your 20's, 30's go to the Doctor for a Check-Up once in awhile. You never know. Not going to the Doctor killed Warren Zevon too. By the time he got to one, he was riddled with Cancer - Done.

  2. #22
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    Quote Originally Posted by sweeteeze View Post
    ?..the cough reflex is not inhibited, but it is strange to me how it mostly occurs at night.... Sweet E
    Hi Sweet E, I had been told in the past the reason for increased coughing at night has to do with posture. When I read your post it triggered me to google the question - I picked up this excerpt off of "Every day Health"

    "3 Reasons Your Cough Symptoms Get Worse at Night

    The Science Behind Nighttime Coughing

    There are a number of reasons why cough symptoms get worse — or seem to — at night:

    Gravity. The biggest reason we cough more at night is simple: gravity, says Mitchell Blass, MD, an infectious disease specialist with Georgia Infectious Diseases, PC, and staff physician at Saint Joseph’s Hospital in Atlanta. “When we lie down, the gastroesophageal reflex kicks in because mucus automatically begins to pool.” The best way to counteract this gravitational pull is elevation. “Sleep with a pillow propping you up a little,” Dr. Blass suggests. “It will help keep the mucus from collecting in the back of the throat.”

    A dry, indoor environment. Dry air can aggravate an already irritated nose and throat, making your nighttime cough worse. You can try a humidifier to put moisture back into the air and make it easier to breathe, but be sure to take proper care of the unit. “Humidifiers are not always safe,” warns Blass. “If the water you put in it isn’t sterile, you run the risk of cycling the germs back into the air or breeding other diseases.” The last thing people with a cold or flu want is to experience complications, says Blass. “Bacterial infections can set in. Many flu-related deaths are caused by pneumonia that hits after people think they’re over the flu.” To ensure you use a humidifier safely, be sure to follow all the directions that it comes with carefully.

    Clearing congestion. Before you curse the cough, remember this: Coughs are actually important in helping you get well. The coughing reflex helps keep your throat and airways clear. As annoying as it may be, that persistent cough is breaking up mucus and helping your body get well."
    Last edited by Cash; 04-15-2013 at 07:04 PM.
    Helpful sweeteeze, teresita Rated helpful
    September 9, 2015

  3. #23
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    candygram has a spectacular aura aboutcandygram has a spectacular aura aboutcandygram has a spectacular aura aboutcandygram has a spectacular aura aboutcandygram has a spectacular aura aboutcandygram has a spectacular aura about

    When I first started spiking my BP I was prescribed Lisinopril. It worked like a charm...until I got this little nagging cough. I mentioned it at an annual visit and poof, that wonderful medicine was gone. I have been through Diovan (didn't really work) and now Lorsartan. I am barely under control. BTW, I was a distance runner and weighed 120 pounds when I started on BP meds years ago.

    Also, reflux can cause asthma like symptoms...coughing and shortness of breath. I was misdiagnosed for many years and after I started on Nexium, I never needed an inhaler again. I guess I am showing my age big time.

  4. I used to have high blood pressure, and after a diuretic didn't do the trick, I was immediately put on lisinopril. I, like several others in this forum immediately developed the awful, persistent cough, which my doctor at the time said was an "uncommon and very tolerable side effect." Needless to say, hacking every 5 seconds was not tolerable in any way whatsoever to me, so I went to another doctor who is very honest and up-front about how drug companies work. He told me they are told by insurance companies to prescribe lisinopril first because it is so darn cheap, and only after somebody complains of an adverse symptom (usually a cough) will the insurance approve something else. He switched me to Benicar (which cured the cough but carried a different side effect I didn't like, but that's another story).

    At any rate, a few months ago a friend of mine recently developed a hacking cough out of the blue that wouldn't go away for weeks, and I kept asking her if she was still sick and she was driving herself crazy not understanding why the cough wouldn't go away. On a whim, I asked if she had been put on blood pressure meds and after getting the "are you psychic?" look (hehe), she showed me the bottle, and sure enough - lisinopril. I told her what my doctor told me and instructed her to call her doctor that very day and have them switch her to something else. Apparently, her doctor didn't even warn her about the (very common) possibility of a cough - and she is the type of person who is of the mentality "if the doctor says so, do it, and don't ask questions." I had to pester her for a week to finally call and now her cough is "magically" cured, but not without some effort and argument from the doctor.

    Just a lesson for anybody to always research a drug's side effects (even the "rare" ones, which I have developed myself for certain drugs) and don't necessarily buy what every doctor says - especially for blood pressure where there are like 6 different classes of drugs that are all shown to be effective for BP reduction.
    Helpful candygram, Stevo1 Rated helpful

  5. Quote Originally Posted by stradamati View Post
    I used to have high blood pressure, and after a diuretic didn't do the trick, I was immediately put on lisinopril. I, like several others in this forum immediately developed the awful, persistent cough, which my doctor at the time said was an "uncommon and very tolerable side effect." Needless to say, hacking every 5 seconds was not tolerable in any way whatsoever to me, so I went to another doctor who is very honest and up-front about how drug companies work. He told me they are told by insurance companies to prescribe lisinopril first because it is so darn cheap, and only after somebody complains of an adverse symptom (usually a cough) will the insurance approve something else. He switched me to Benicar (which cured the cough but carried a different side effect I didn't like, but that's another story).

    At any rate, a few months ago a friend of mine recently developed a hacking cough out of the blue that wouldn't go away for weeks, and I kept asking her if she was still sick and she was driving herself crazy not understanding why the cough wouldn't go away. On a whim, I asked if she had been put on blood pressure meds and after getting the "are you psychic?" look (hehe), she showed me the bottle, and sure enough - lisinopril. I told her what my doctor told me and instructed her to call her doctor that very day and have them switch her to something else. Apparently, her doctor didn't even warn her about the (very common) possibility of a cough - and she is the type of person who is of the mentality "if the doctor says so, do it, and don't ask questions." I had to pester her for a week to finally call and now her cough is "magically" cured, but not without some effort and argument from the doctor.

    Just a lesson for anybody to always research a drug's side effects (even the "rare" ones, which I have developed myself for certain drugs) and don't necessarily buy what every doctor says - especially for blood pressure where there are like 6 different classes of drugs that are all shown to be effective for BP reduction.
    My husband takes lisinopril and we just lost our med insurance. I'm looking for a reliable source for ordering it. If anyone has suggestions please post! Thanks!

  6. @Radiogaga Alldaychemist has it for really cheap. Basically, any non-controlled or "benign" drug (ie, non-addictive, non-controversial), can be found there for very low prices. I've found their quality to be consistently excellent, and I've always had everything I've ever ordered arrive in a very timely fashion. They ship from India through EMS and always provide tracking. They have just about every blood pressure/cholesterol medication you can think of, including the more expensive ones that are not always covered by insurance.

    When you do the search, look under both the dropdowns "Equivalent Brands" and "Generics" - sometimes the category you think a name is under is not necessarily the case (ie a generic name might be under brand, and vice versa). If you check reviews around here for them you'll see they're very highly regarded.
    Helpful HarryIrene, Anne Onomis, 14heather Rated helpful

  7. #27
    Thank you so much, stradamati! I know we aren't supposed to ask for sources, but I had been in a bind here trying to search one out for my husband's benazepril. Short of it is, the one doc in our new area he managed to make an appointment with can't see him for some time, and the jerk back where we used to live is refusing to call the prescription in unless he comes and sees him again (pretty much impossible because of his work).

  8. #28
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    Quote Originally Posted by stradamati View Post
    I used to have high blood pressure, and after a diuretic didn't do the trick, I was immediately put on lisinopril. I, like several others in this forum immediately developed the awful, persistent cough, which my doctor at the time said was an "uncommon and very tolerable side effect." Needless to say, hacking every 5 seconds was not tolerable in any way whatsoever to me, so I went to another doctor who is very honest and up-front about how drug companies work. He told me they are told by insurance companies to prescribe lisinopril first because it is so darn cheap, and only after somebody complains of an adverse symptom (usually a cough) will the insurance approve something else. He switched me to Benicar (which cured the cough but carried a different side effect I didn't like, but that's another story).


    At any rate, a few months ago a friend of mine recently developed a hacking cough out of the blue that wouldn't go away for weeks, and I kept asking her if she was still sick and she was driving herself crazy not understanding why the cough wouldn't go away. On a whim, I asked if she had been put on blood pressure meds and after getting the "are you psychic?" look (hehe), she showed me the bottle, and sure enough - lisinopril. I told her what my doctor told me and instructed her to call her doctor that very day and have them switch her to something else. Apparently, her doctor didn't even warn her about the (very common) possibility of a cough - and she is the type of person who is of the mentality "if the doctor says so, do it, and don't ask questions." I had to pester her for a week to finally call and now her cough is "magically" cured, but not without some effort and argument from the doctor.

    Just a lesson for anybody to always research a drug's side effects (even the "rare" ones, which I have developed myself for certain drugs) and don't necessarily buy what every doctor says - especially for blood pressure where there are like 6 different classes of drugs that are all shown to be effective for BP reduction.
    A good number of years ago after my first HBP diagnosis, my Doc started me on Lisinopril, and within a month or two I developed the dry hacking cough described by many on this thread. I contacted my Doc and he immediately switched me to Losartin, which I do not see mentioned here as an alternative. I have had absolutely no problems since, and have been on Losartin now for many years.

    Publius
    "I have my books and my poetry to protect me” ~ Paul Simon

  9. #29
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    You know, I was on lisinopril for ages, and I never developed that cough. Was probably asked like a thousand times; somehow, I never realized it was quite this common. Guess I just got lucky

  10. #30
    I'm not on lisinopril, but my mom was and she developed a dry hacking cough so she switched to a different class.

    In regards to the side effects of ACE inhibitors and ARBs, patients may develop a dry hacking cough (much more common in ACE inhibitors than ARBs) in the first couple of weeks. However, some may develop the cough months later. In this case, if they were on lisinopril then switching to an ARB is a possible choice.

    A rare and fatal side effect is angioedema (slightly more common in ACE inhibitors than ARBs). If a patient experiences angioedema on lisinopril, for example, it would be best to discontinue the medication and avoid trying an ARB. Even after discontinuing lisinopril, a patient may experience recurrent episodes for months.

    For patients who have diabetes, being on either an ACE inhibitor or ARB is beneficial because it's renal protective, preventing further progression of diabetic nephropathy even if their blood pressure is normal.

  11. #31
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    I take it and so does my wife.No dry cough at all for either of us.You can get it for free with script at Publix supermarket's pharmacy along with Amlodopine My wife has no insurance either so it works out great that she can get it for free.
    Helpful Allycat Rated helpful

  12. #32
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    Quote Originally Posted by dbt123 View Post
    You know, I was on lisinopril for ages, and I never developed that cough. Was probably asked like a thousand times; somehow, I never realized it was quite this common. Guess I just got lucky
    Just finished reading Dr. Samuel J Mann's "Hypertension and You." I highly recommend it, since he describes all the advantages and disadvantages of every single HBP drug in great detail, and even describes how doctors will frequently mis-prescribe depending on the overall medical condition.

    In his discussion on lisinopril, he indicates that for many situations, it is the first "go-to" HBP (of the ARB type), both because of the fairly safe way it works, and also because insurers like its modest price. Practically all insurers require doctors first try the lowest-cost alternatives. According to Dr. Mann, about 10% of all those taking lisinopril WILL develop the cough side effect, and then the first HBP med the doctor will usually move them to is indeed Losartan. Losartan is more expensive, but since it is also generic, it is still much less expensive than about four or five other brands that are still NOT available generically. He has price charts in one part of the book also, and these non-generics are about 5-6 times more expensive than the generics. The ARB type drugs are among the safest of all the HBP drugs, according to Dr. Mann.

    Publius
    Last edited by Publius; 08-26-2016 at 05:30 PM.
    "I have my books and my poetry to protect me” ~ Paul Simon

  13. I have been on Lisinipril, amlodipine, and hctz for years and only very recently learned that you cannot just stop taking the first two. I had no idea and use to run out quite often. It scared the bejesus out of me :/

  14. #34
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    I am also on the same Lisinopril,amlodopine for many years.I check my BP reqularly.I have noticed in the past month that my BP with the medication has been pretty high for me.It usually runs in the 130's over 79-89 and now it is reading daily from 145 -170 over 80-90.I don't know why.I will have to let my Doc know on my next appointment.One thing I have noticed is when I use Viagra,my BP is perfect.I know 1 of the reactions of many that could happen is low BP.It keeps my BP perfect for 2 days.I wonder if that medication could be used as a BP medicine,maybe in a lower dose.I take 100mg tablets.Obviously this is not good for people with good or low BP and they need to watch when they use Viagra,but for me it works great for my HBP.Just a thought?

  15. #35
    10 mg has done wonders for my BP. I did not experience any side effects

  16. I saw that Lisinopril can cause dizziness and tiredness. I've been on it for about a year, but until about 2 months ago, I was only taking it about twice a week. Since then, I started taking it almost daily.. I did the put 2 and 2 together, until I saw this post, but since then, I've had extreme fatigue and my head feels like it's in a foggy state. Has anyone else had this problem? Will it go away with time or should I try something else? Is my issue even caused my Lisinopril?

  17. #37
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    Yes, lisinopril can cause that. Either take it before bedtime, or ask your doctor for something else.
    Helpful Crabbypatty Rated helpful
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  18. #38
    I haven’t been on PR in ages... wow I do miss so many people here and so many things about the site


    But I contracted a life changing health issue through long time animal husbandry.

    It’s not zoonotic but maybe it is and more likely it’s happily zooming back and forth as it adapts to new environments.

    It’s something to do with
    parasites mold
    dust
    tap water quality

    and it will aggravate every other issue one has.

    I think Joni Mitchell has been struggling with it for years.

    Doctors will not recognize it because this is a First World country.

    We Don’t Have Those Problems Anymore.

    Oh H**^ yeah we do!

    Anyway, we currently have no health insurance...my husband badly needs lisinopril.

    Thanks for letting me know abt the coughing. I will research side ways of fixing that.


    Now this is what I wonder.

    Anyone here use the new phone app Doctor Prescription apps?

    Do they work?
    We dearly appreciate any feedback or advice.

    Thank you all!!!

  19. #39
    I am on Lisinopropil, and have been for years. I was put on another, Clonidine, to supplement it. I have had very few side effects. I have heard of some people who develop a cough while on Lisinopropil. I don't know why that happens. (after posting, I saw the coughing was brought up earlier. Luckily, I don't have that issue with it.)
    Last edited by mymesh; 07-17-2019 at 08:59 PM. Reason: add
    Helpful Stevo1 Rated helpful

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