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Thread: Documentary on chronic pain

  1. #1
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    Default Documentary on chronic pain

    Many on here might find some comfort in know that some voices are speaking out - will they be heard by the right people?

    A long-awaited documentary about chronic pain in North America is shining a light on the other side of the opioid crisis – how chronic pain patients and their doctors have been marginalized and persecuted in the name of fighting opioid addiction.

    “Pain Warriors” is being released by Gravitas Ventur

    https://www.painnewsnetwork.org/stor...t-for-our-time

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    Quote Originally Posted by Bawston View Post
    Many on here might find some comfort in know that some voices are speaking out - will they be heard by the right people?

    A long-awaited documentary about chronic pain in North America is shining a light on the other side of the opioid crisis – how chronic pain patients and their doctors have been marginalized and persecuted in the name of fighting opioid addiction.

    “Pain Warriors” is being released by Gravitas Ventur

    https://www.painnewsnetwork.org/stor...t-for-our-time
    Need it to go “viral.” They always listen better the more popular and the more outraged the public becomes...
    Helpful M77, Seychelle Rated helpful
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    The cause of all suffering is attachment...

  3. This is an eye-opener. I hope many people will see it and be able to put their feet into the shoes of those who are suffering from chronic pain.
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    @jaders...unfortunately it seems that people can only focus on one issue at a time, maybe two issues but not more than that. I read an interesting local article about how the rate of overdoses has gone down during the pandemic and that regulations have eased on Suboxone so that people can do virtual check ins and receive their medications via mail.

    Isn’t it interesting that they claimed OD’s would go UP during this. So to me it seems like the hard a$$ approach doesn’t make for better outcomes. I wonder what would have happened if they just let people stay on their prescription pain meds ... let me guess - fewer heroine and fentanyl overdose deaths.
    Helpful Seychelle, snowy, Cll Rated helpful

  5. Quote Originally Posted by Bawston View Post
    @jaders...unfortunately it seems that people can only focus on one issue at a time, maybe two issues but not more than that. I read an interesting local article about how the rate of overdoses has gone down during the pandemic and that regulations have eased on Suboxone so that people can do virtual check ins and receive their medications via mail.

    Isn’t it interesting that they claimed OD’s would go UP during this. So to me it seems like the hard a$$ approach doesn’t make for better outcomes. I wonder what would have happened if they just let people stay on their prescription pain meds ... let me guess - fewer heroine and fentanyl overdose deaths.

    Regulations were eased. The DEA announced in March that doctors could renew opioid prescriptions without the requisite office visits, piss tests, pill counts, and that patients who could not receive their regular non-opioid treatments could be given opioids to control their pain until other treatments could resume. It made the DEA look downright reasonable, but a lot of doctors refused to go along with it. I couldn't be seen for my steroid injections, but the doctor refused to prescribe opioids and referred me to my primary doctor, who also refused to prescribe them and referred me back to the doctor who does the injections. So I had no treatment at all for about three months in there until "non-essential" procedures started up again and I could get back in for an injection.

    I've so far only heard of one pain patient whose treatment was uninterrupted, but that doctor required the patient to come in for a face-to-face visit despite the lockdown.

    They've tried to keep it in the news. I've seen a handful of stories claiming that prescription opioid overdoses increased during lockdown. Based on the quoted sources, it seemed like the stories were driven by Kolodny and other anti-opioid zealots, trying to keep the issue on the front burner after coronavirus oh-so-rudely upstaged their made-up crisis.

    What I cannot understand for the life of me is why the public swallowed the opioid nonsense hook, line, and sinker, without even asking for evidence and despite evidence to contrary also presented by the media, yet so many refuse to believe that Covid is serious and accuse the media of exaggerating the pandemic.
    Helpful snowy, Seychelle, jaders, Cll Rated helpful
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    Quote Originally Posted by Bawston View Post
    Many on here might find some comfort in know that some voices are speaking out - will they be heard by the right people?

    A long-awaited documentary about chronic pain in North America is shining a light on the other side of the opioid crisis – how chronic pain patients and their doctors have been marginalized and persecuted in the name of fighting opioid addiction.

    “Pain Warriors” is being released by Gravitas Ventur

    https://www.painnewsnetwork.org/stor...t-for-our-time
    My doctor and Clinic have eased up on opioids rules. I was going in monthly, now it's every 4 months. I get a 90 day supply now, and before I only got a 30 day supply and had to go in and get them. I no longer get called randomly to go in and get my pills counted and before 2 staff members had to count them. And best of all...no more pee tests! Before, I'd have to sit there and drink tons of water and coffee and pee before I was "allowed" to leave. Many times I left in tears absolutely humiliated by the treatment I received. The very last time I had to go in, I could not do the pee test after trying for 2 hours. They told me I could not leave. I just stood up and told them I am not a criminal and won't sit there any longer and I left. My doctor called the next morning and said I couldn't get my meds unless I took the test. I told her what happened and boy were they nice to me when I went back. And that's the last time I had to do that.
    Helpful Seychelle, Binky, El Grandote, Cll Rated helpful
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  7. Quote Originally Posted by snowy View Post
    My doctor and Clinic have eased up on opioids rules. I was going in monthly, now it's every 4 months. I get a 90 day supply now, and before I only got a 30 day supply and had to go in and get them. I no longer get called randomly to go in and get my pills counted and before 2 staff members had to count them. And best of all...no more pee tests! Before, I'd have to sit there and drink tons of water and coffee and pee before I was "allowed" to leave. Many times I left in tears absolutely humiliated by the treatment I received. The very last time I had to go in, I could not do the pee test after trying for 2 hours. They told me I could not leave. I just stood up and told them I am not a criminal and won't sit there any longer and I left. My doctor called the next morning and said I couldn't get my meds unless I took the test. I told her what happened and boy were they nice to me when I went back. And that's the last time I had to do that.

    I once had a nurse dig her nails into my upper arm and growl, sotto voce, "You will NOT leave here until you've given a urine sample!"

    This was in response to my asking for a cup of water and then refilling the tiny cup a few times because I didn't think I could produce enough urine to give the sample. My hunch is she thought I was trying to dilute my urine, which, if she were competent, she would know I couldn't accomplish by slamming a couple of Dixie cups of water minutes before the test.

    But it wasn't really about that. It was about control. Like all this bullshit is about control. Sure, being demanding works sometimes. It helps to be white, well- educated (but not so well educated as to question their authority!), and to not have any obvious cues of being less-than-middle class (but don't dress TOO nicely, even if you're coming straight to the appointment from work, because overdressing is a sign of drug-seeking!)

    People say all the time, "Well, I just wouldn't put up with that treatment! I would report it!" But that's the fast-track to a reputation as a Problem Patient. That track just happens to be faster for some than for others.

    I reported an ER doctor once after he gave me an IV painkiller (after I had requested an oral dose, because the IV route makes me dysphoric). AFTER the drug was administered, he decided it was a fine time to start asking me questions like, "When was the last time you were here? Were you given a painkiller then? Which one were you given?"

    Sleepy and disoriented, I couldn't remember any of the answers to his questions, causing him to get agitated and start yelling the questions at me until the friend (a large man) who had brought me to the ER physically stepped in between us.

    Reporting the doctor for that accomplished nothing but further cementing my reputation as a Problem Patient.

    Who can complain, how, and when are a complex social dance. And no pain patient can do it indefinitely without consequence. Some of it's just pure luck (which ER doctor you happen to get, whether your assigned nurse is having a bad day, etc.)
    Helpful Blackbird123 Rated helpful
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    Quote Originally Posted by nobknee View Post
    Regulations were eased. The DEA announced in March that doctors could renew opioid prescriptions without the requisite office visits, piss tests, pill counts, and that patients who could not receive their regular non-opioid treatments could be given opioids to control their pain until other treatments could resume. It made the DEA look downright reasonable, but a lot of doctors refused to go along with it. I couldn't be seen for my steroid injections, but the doctor refused to prescribe opioids and referred me to my primary doctor, who also refused to prescribe them and referred me back to the doctor who does the injections. So I had no treatment at all for about three months in there until "non-essential" procedures started up again and I could get back in for an injection.

    I've so far only heard of one pain patient whose treatment was uninterrupted, but that doctor required the patient to come in for a face-to-face visit despite the lockdown.

    They've tried to keep it in the news. I've seen a handful of stories claiming that prescription opioid overdoses increased during lockdown. Based on the quoted sources, it seemed like the stories were driven by Kolodny and other anti-opioid zealots, trying to keep the issue on the front burner after coronavirus oh-so-rudely upstaged their made-up crisis.

    What I cannot understand for the life of me is why the public swallowed the opioid nonsense hook, line, and sinker, without even asking for evidence and despite evidence to contrary also presented by the media, yet so many refuse to believe that Covid is serious and accuse the media of exaggerating the pandemic.
    Oh the crap about opioid OD's increasing during the quarantine was just more fuel by the folks that just want everyone to get back to work to save the economy and stop worrying about this "phony pandemic..." It's amazing what people come up with to further their agenda.

    As far as getting doctors to suddenly change course after the DEA has been breathing down their neck - that seems unlikely to happen very fast. My doctor who gives me a tiny amount of codeine DID give me a free refill however, which hasn't happened for way more than a year. I'm sure that was due to the pandemic as well.

    Why everyone is so happy to persecute the opiate users and not believe the media around Covid19 is just more of the same. Everyone loves to hate drug addicts and most folks seem to think if you're on pain meds for a long time you just HAVE to be a dirtbag addict. The ignorance is astounding. But having to stay home and social distance, or even wear a friggin' mask? Well that's just "big brother" making the average Joe's life a bit uncomfortable, and we can't have that!!

    To me, America is not known for its wisdom and it keeps showing this again and again...
    Helpful Cll Rated helpful
    The cause of all suffering is attachment...

  9. Quote Originally Posted by jaders View Post
    Oh the crap about opioid OD's increasing during the quarantine was just more fuel by the folks that just want everyone to get back to work to save the economy and stop worrying about this "phony pandemic..." It's amazing what people come up with to further their agenda.
    There was just another article in the Washington Post yesterday, claiming drug overdoses have risen since the start of the pandemic. Same old, same old.

    Quote Originally Posted by jaders View Post
    As far as getting doctors to suddenly change course after the DEA has been breathing down their neck - that seems unlikely to happen very fast.
    And you know how far my sympathy for that extends. Both the DEA and the AMA urged doctors to cover their patients with opioids until other treatments could resume. It's hard to imagine what more permission they feel they need. These are well-educated people, not kindergartners.
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