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Thread: alopecia in women, opinions if this is you

  1. Default alopecia in women, opinions if this is you

    I'd like to know if you or anyone you personally know who has alopecia areata, were they able to use a shampoo to stop hair loss or encourage hair growth, without having to do the shots or some of the other painful or dangerous forms of treatment. Thanks!
    Helpful taralumia Rated helpful
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    comb over with powder. rogaine on a regular basis.
    Helpful wintermute Rated helpful

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    Quote Originally Posted by pia View Post
    comb over with powder. rogaine on a regular basis.
    Hairloss in women is caused by DHEA rather than DHT which causes it in men. Spirolactin is effective in me as a topical, not sure about DHEA and whether spirolactin and rogaine will block it from bonding to hair follicles.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 88jymbo View Post
    Hairloss in women is caused by DHEA rather than DHT which causes it in men. Spirolactin is effective in me as a topical, not sure about DHEA and whether spirolactin and rogaine will block it from bonding to hair follicles.
    Actually, there are a number of causes of hair loss in women, including thyroid issues, aging, and the same factors that cause male pattern baldness. But the OP asked about alopecia areata. That is a very specific condition where people develop patches of baldness. It is caused by an autoimmune attack on the hair follicles. Once the attack subsides, hair may return, but then it may fall out again in different or even the same areas. New hair may be of a different texture than what was there before.

    I have experience with this one, @mixedautumn . It is a real bitch for anyone, but especially for women. In my case I went through active alopecia areata for about a year and a half around 7 years ago. It was horrible. I don't really want to go into the details right now, but I will be happy to share my experience later or through pm. There are no drugs that can guarantee healing, although a few things can help a little. Right now, I have no bald patches, and my hair is pretty long. But it is getting thinner than I like, and the thought of those bald patches always looms around the corner.

    My best advice: Get good with wigs, extensions and hats. And when you have good periods of growth, try not to take your hair too seriously. Enjoy it while it lasts, and when it turns on you, have fun with funny hair colors and wigs....really.
    Helpful Jazie, snowy, wintermute Rated helpful
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    I have a friend who has this and every couple of years it hits her hard in either the same or a different area as @taralumia has indicated. It has to be hard to adjust too, especially in a Professional working environment as she is in, but she has come to terms with it.

    When it gets really bad she is a master at wearing wonderful scarfing on her head that matches her suits/outfits. Off time she wears ball caps or stylish hats that cover it. She has 4 kids so she had no time to crawl up into a corner and hide as I know at times she felt like doing. From what she has told me there is really no overnight remedy and she had long hair for ages that she styled in ways to cover. Now she sports a rather edgy short do, but that was her choice after all the years she has dealt with it. I've known her for over 20yrs and it still returns.
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    When I was going through a bout of telogen effluvium due to hypothyroidism, I did a lot of reading about hairloss in women, and visited a highly esteemed hair clinic at UCSF. From what I learned about alopecia areata, there is a very high chance that your hair will grow back on its own. Rogaine can help, and as a woman who has used it, I can tell you that it does speed up the process of regrowth. It is an investment though, and you will need to use it consistently. My hair doctor told me that Rogaine is like a fertilizer for hair.

    In the meantime, you may find that hair powder will help disguise the thin spots.
    Helpful caseycasey Rated helpful

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    Quote Originally Posted by 88jymbo View Post
    Hairloss in women is caused by DHEA rather than DHT which causes it in men. Spirolactin is effective in me as a topical, not sure about DHEA and whether spirolactin and rogaine will block it from bonding to hair follicles.
    DHT can cause hairloss in woman just like it does in men. Both men and women can have androgenic alopecia, or "pattern baldness". Propecia/finasteride is prescribed to both men and women for androgenic alopecia, because it has been discovered that it can work for both sexes. And Rogaine has been very successful for hair regrowth in women. The manufacturer even sells "Women's Rogaine".
    Last edited by wintermute; 05-19-2016 at 04:37 PM.
    Helpful taralumia, anthrtrvlr Rated helpful

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    Alopecia is not contagious. And it is not due to nerves. What happens is that the immune system basically attacks the hair follicles, causing hair loss. In all forms of alopecia areata, the hair follicles remain alive and are ready to resume normal hair production whenever they receive the appropriate signal. In all cases, hair regrowth may occur even without treatment and even after many years.

    Intralesional corticosteroid injections is the best way imo: these are the injections into bare skin patches are by far most commonly used treatment for alopecia areata. The injections are usually given by a dermatologist who uses a tiny needle to give multiple injections into the skin in and around the bare patches.

    Topical Minoxidil: Five percent topical minoxidil solution applied twice daily may regrow hair in alopecia areata. Scalp, eyebrows, and bear may respond. If scalp hair regrows completely, treatment can be stopped. Two percent topical minoxidil solution alone is not effective in alopecia areata; response may improve if cortisone cream is applied thirty minutes after the monoxidil.
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    Resurrecting a slightly older thread. I searched for "hair falling out" and found this thread. Mine is coming out in clumps. This morning was the worst I've seen it. I sat up in bed and could feel hair hanging on my lower back, and grabbed at it. Literally a clump of hair. I'm not sure what's causing it. I have had some med changes and birth control change recently. I am just hoping it's not going to continue! If it continues much longer, I will be seeing a specialist. What type of specialist do I go to for this?

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    Quote Originally Posted by M_Aria View Post
    Resurrecting a slightly older thread. I searched for "hair falling out" and found this thread. Mine is coming out in clumps. This morning was the worst I've seen it. I sat up in bed and could feel hair hanging on my lower back, and grabbed at it. Literally a clump of hair. I'm not sure what's causing it. I have had some med changes and birth control change recently. I am just hoping it's not going to continue! If it continues much longer, I will be seeing a specialist. What type of specialist do I go to for this?
    A dermatologist can help you. It could very well be stress related, which is my issue. I know how scary it is to see the clumps! The Atlantic has a good article "Why Stress Makes Your Hair Fall Out...and why it happens three months later" http://www.theatlantic.com/health/ar...ll-out/471771/
    Helpful taralumia, M_Aria Rated helpful

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    @M_Aria , you could start with your PCP, who will likely be able to run a few tests to help you determine the cause. Like @dvz said, it could be stress. But it could also be a sign of a thyroid or autoimmune disorder. There are a number of causes for hair loss. I don't know if you're female, but if you are, you should know that females also get pattern or androgenic alopecia.
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    Quote Originally Posted by taralumia View Post
    @M_Aria , you could start with your PCP, who will likely be able to run a few tests to help you determine the cause. Like @dvz said, it could be stress. But it could also be a sign of a thyroid or autoimmune disorder. There are a number of causes for hair loss. I don't know if you're female, but if you are, you should know that females also get pattern or androgenic alopecia.
    Awesome, thank you so much for your reply. Also for yours, @dvz and yes it could be stress but more importantly and as the article pointed out, it could be falling estrogen levels as I stopped taking birth control a few months ago. If it continues I will definitely start with my PCP since I have a good one (for once).
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    I had alopecia areata when I was 26, 18 years ago, it was likely caused by emotional trauma/stress. My hair grew back and fortunately it hasn't returned. I wasn't given any medication so can't comment on what is available now. My hair regrowth was totally different; it grew back fine and straight when it used to be very thick and curly. I much preferred my original hair but I'm delighted that hair grew back at all.
    I did get wigs but the consultant told me not to wear it 24/7 due to blocking re growth follicles etc.

    I so hope others; grows back quickly, my heart goes out to you.

    Victoria.
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