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Thread: Eliquis (Apixaban) For AFIB Risk Factors

  1. #1

    Default Eliquis (Apixaban) For AFIB Risk Factors

    Despite Eliquis (Apixaban) being eligible for generic comparables, from what has been published 2022 appears to be the release date for a generic. That's helpful right. Since with insurance etc. a 30 day supply is 300 plus bucks and the cardiologist prescribed this specifically (no, he did not reveal why but odds are remuneration plays no small part in the equation) for AFIB.

    Does anyone have any info on a less expensive source, why this is profoundly expensive and how is this is more beneficial? The Doctors are keen to provide samples but that seems like a crack dealer getting us hooked then pulling the freebies off the menu.

    I'm actually just looking for anyone that has been down this road that might shed some light on this.

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  3. #2
    nope, not happening? that is so odd, the uk pays nothing to 60 pounds/month and if you are up close and personal with this drug in the us you are aware that wouldn't pass the laugh test. anyone aware if the uk (EU in general) fill fully legal prescriptions from the us?

  4. #3
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    @wildings

    Eliquis is actually quite superior to the alternative, Coumadin ( Warfarin) by a statistically meaningful margin. Coumadin requires constant blood testing , normally every 2-3 weeks to check PT/inr levels for as long as you take Coumadin. It’s a giant PITA for most patients. Also, because it interacts with many medications and foods, you can get yourself into a situation where your levels are totally out of range and this is very dangerous. If your PT/inr is too low, your are not adequately protected from some of the serious problems that A-Fib can cause. And if the levels are too high, you are at serious risk for bleeding from what would be otherwise uneventful matters.

    Eliquis is so new, that you’re right, I think a generic would be hard to find. However, like most major Pharma Companies, they have a lot of Patient Support Programs available. It never hurts to try, as you have nothing to lose but a few minutes on a Toll Free Call. If you have any prescription coverage, see the link below.

    Normally, you will have to give the Pharma Company permission to act on your behalf with BOTH your Insurer as well as the prescriber, but that can be done online or by fax or mail. They’ll act on your behalf to tell your prescribing physician exactly what to do and say to get your insurer to cover the med. in this case, if you qualify, they will mail you a card for 24 months of a 30 day supply with a maximum out of pocket copay of $10.00.

    Link: https://www.eliquis.com/eliquis/hcp/...ources?ovl=isi

    If you have no insurance, use this link to apply for reduced or free medication from the maker, Bristol-Myers Squibb.

    Link: http://www.bmspaf.org
    Last edited by H20shed65; 10-12-2018 at 11:41 PM.
    Helpful wildings Rated helpful

  5. #4
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    Quote Originally Posted by H20shed65 View Post
    @wildings

    Eliquis is actually quite superior to the alternative, Coumadin ( Warfarin) by a statistically meaningful margin. Coumadin requires constant blood testing , normally every 2-3 weeks to check PT/inr levels for as long as you take Coumadin. It’s a giant PITA for most patients. Also, because it interacts with many medications and foods, you can get yourself into a situation where your levels are totally out of range and this is very dangerous. If your PT/inr is too low, your are not adequately protected from some of the serious problems that A-Fib can cause. And if the levels are too high, you are at serious risk for bleeding from what would be otherwise uneventful matters.

    Eliquis is so new, that you’re right, I think a generic would be hard to find. However, like most major Pharma Companies, they have a lot of Patient Support Programs available. It never hurts to try, as you have nothing to lose but a few minutes on a Toll Free Call. If you have any prescription coverage, see the link below.

    Normally, you will have to give the Pharma Company permission to act on your behalf with BOTH your Insurer as well as the prescriber, but that can be done online or by fax or mail. They’ll act on your behalf to tell your prescribing physician exactly what to do and say to get your insurer to cover the med. in this case, if you qualify, they will mail you a card for 24 months of a 30 day supply with a maximum out of pocket copay of $10.00.

    Link: https://www.eliquis.com/eliquis/hcp/...ources?ovl=isi

    If you have no insurance, use this link to apply for reduced or free medication from the maker, Bristol-Myers Squibb.

    Link: http://www.bmspaf.org
    Hey, shed, just a question (or a couple), if you happen to know...

    I think (from context) that @wildings may be in the UK, not USA (please feel free to correct me if this is wrong!) but doesn't the B-MS program only apply to US patients? (Who also don't have any insurance coverage, iirc?) That the program to provide the reduced-cost medication came from a settlement of some class-action lawsuit from around a decade ago?

    Anyway, not trying to step on your helpful suggestion, but I really thought there were a lot of caveats to the "help" available to patients.

    Thanks, hoarder of rep points (all hail!!)
    Likes H20shed65, wildings liked this post

  6. #5
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    @calgal99

    I really have no clue where @wildings is from, however I would think if they were in the UK, this medication would easily be covered by NHS. But I know little about the various NHS services in the UK, so I may well be wrong.

    As to the Settlement Question, I doubt it here. Most large Pharma Co.’s in the US offer this type of program to patients and physicians with new and expensive medications. Make no mistake, it is not out of charity, rather self interest.

    These Pharmaceutical Companies know precisely how to game every Health Insurer’s Tiered Prescription Drug Plan. They have entire divisions setup which serve one purpose only: How can we get the patient’s Insurer to cover even a portion of the cost of the medication? Why? Because they know most patients do not know how to challenge their Insurers when RX coverage is denied and will either just not fill the RX or worse, opt for a cheaper substitute. In this scenario, the Pharmaceutical Company makes exactly ZERO DOLLARS.

    If they can cajole your Insurer into picking up even 50% of the cost AND they take a hit on their margin by offering patients a 1 or 2 year discount card so your maximum out of pocket cost is only $10.00 or even $20.00, they may not be getting full price, but it beats ZERO dollars 7 days a week!

    Plus they realize the more patients utilize their new drug, the more likely it will be that Insurance Companies will face mounting pressure over time from their members to add this drug to their Formulary.
    Last edited by H20shed65; 10-13-2018 at 05:16 PM.
    Helpful calgal99, wildings Rated helpful
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  7. #6
    Quote Originally Posted by calgal99 View Post
    Hey, shed, just a question (or a couple), if you happen to know...

    I think (from context) that @wildings may be in the UK, not USA (please feel free to correct me if this is wrong!) but doesn't the B-MS program only apply to US patients? (Who also don't have any insurance coverage, iirc?) That the program to provide the reduced-cost medication came from a settlement of some class-action lawsuit from around a decade ago?

    Anyway, not trying to step on your helpful suggestion, but I really thought there were a lot of caveats to the "help" available to patients.

    Thanks, hoarder of rep points (all hail!!)
    nope, though i've been to the uk in my military years i am in fact a product of ye old east texas. that being the archetype of budweiser, white socks, stealing farm equipment.... well, that may be an outlier but you get the picture. i was merely assuming if they would move pk's they might be inclined to do eliquis. thanks to @H20shed65 i think i may make some progress oor if not there will be some place that will.
    Likes H20shed65 liked this post

  8. Eliquis (Apixaban) For AFIB Risk Factors

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