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Thread: Certain antibiotics may cause aortic aneurysm, FDA warns

  1. #1
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    Default Certain antibiotics may cause aortic aneurysm, FDA warns

    Certain antibiotics may cause aortic aneurysm, FDA warns
    By Jen Christensen, CNN
    (CNN) The US Food and Drug Administration warned on Thursday that the benefits of fluoroquinolone antibiotics do not outweigh the risks -- which include aortic aneurysm -- for certain patients, according to the latest research. The research is based on reports of patient problems and on studies published between 2015 and 2018.

    Fluoroquinolone antibiotics are often used to treat serious respiratory infections, pneumonia, urinary tract infection, and even plague and exposure to anthrax. They include drugs sold under the names ciprofloxacin (Cipro), gemifloxacin (Factive), levofloxacin (Levaquin), moxifloxacin (Avelox), norfloxacin (Noroxin) and ofloxacin (Floxin).

    The drugs may cause aortic aneurysm, a bulge in an artery that can grow and burst, causing dangerous or fatal bleeding.

    Patients most at risk for an aortic aneurysm after taking these antibiotics are the elderly, those with high blood pressure, people who have a history of blockages of the aorta or other blood vessels, and those who have genetic conditions like Marfan syndrome or Ehlers-Danlos syndrome.

    "Although the risk of aortic aneurysm or dissection is low, we've observed that patients are twice as likely to experience an aortic aneurysm or dissection when prescribed a fluoroquinolone drug," FDA Commissioner Dr. Scott Gottlieb said in a statement. "For patients who have an aortic aneurysm or are known to be at risk of an aortic aneurysm, we do not believe the benefits outweigh this risk, and alternative treatment should be considered."

    For patients who don't fall into these risk categories, fluoroquinolones may still be a good option. They have been helping patients with bacterial infections for more than 30 years.

    The FDA is requiring that a warning about these risks be added to prescribing information and to patient medication guides.

    In July, the agency sent a notice that these drugs may significantly decrease blood sugar and negatively impact mental health. In 2016, the FDA said that the drugs may have a disabling side effect on muscles, nerves, joints and the central nervous system and should be restricted for use in some simpler infections.

    The FDA said it will continue to monitor for any new safety concerns associated with the antibiotics. "The FDA remains committed to keeping the risk information about these products current and comprehensive and will continue to update the public," Gottleib said.

    If you are in one of these at risk categories and are taking one of these antibiotics, experts recommend talking to your doctor about it but continuing to take the medication.

    https://amp.cnn.com/cnn/2018/12/20/h...-bn/index.html
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    Dear g_d, the bugs keep getting stronger, the meds keep getting stronger, it seems like one or the other is eventually going to kill us! (Okay, I'm using SF hype here, but there seems to be a kernel of truth to this, too.) (Maybe the naked mole rat babies can save us humans. <-- ref to an article from earlier this week about a litter of such things at San Diego zoo....)
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    I fall into one of those risk groups. I have high blood pressure. I have been prescribed Cipro many times in the past. This is good info to know. Thank you for posting it.
    Last edited by CrayonBox; 12-22-2018 at 12:22 AM.
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    jaders has a reputation beyond reputejaders has a reputation beyond repute
    I was prescribed one of those antibiotics for an intractable sinus infection, but I'd never heard of the drug before, so I read about it before I took it, and didn't like all the stuff I read, especially about how it can affect a person's tendons including the actual rupture of tendons... Yikes. I guess all meds have their risks, but this one scared me. On the other hand, my housemate, who had no insurance took it for HER sinus infection and it worked without a problem.
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  5. #5
    This particular class of antimicrobials, the fluoroquinolones, has been linked to a host of adverse effects including tendon rupture and peripheral neuropathies. This is only the latest issue to be linked to these drugs. Some of the effects, such as the tendon issues (and while it's most commonly the Achilles tendon that's affected pretty much any tendon in the body is vulnerable) can surface well after the course of drugs has been completed, which has made it difficult over the years to get the warnings added. More often the adverse effects show up fairly quickly, but not always.

    A year or so ago the FDA added black box warnings to this class of drugs warning of the potential for tendon damage and nerve damage. These adverse effects can occur together, and they are not always reversible. Although most people can probably take these drugs without the adverse effects, if you're one of the susceptible ones these drugs really can wreck your life. I won't take them for any reason other than to save my life or prevent an amputation - to me they are just not worth the risk. If you want to know about what they can do to a person try Googling the term "floxed" - that's the slang term people who've been harmed by these drugs use to describe what's happened to them. And yet doctors still routinely prescribe them for community-acquired infections. But I won't take them, nor will I allow anyone in my family to take them (at least not without strong pushback from me).

    If you absolutely MUST take one of these drugs then add a magnesium supplement while you're taking it and continue the magnesium for at least a month afterward. Magnesium is one of the few things that has been shown to mitigate some of the damage, sometimes.
    Last edited by Ellyn; 12-22-2018 at 12:06 PM.
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  6. #6
    Here's a link to an interesting article about the fluoroquinolone class of antimicrobials. There are LOTS of articles out there, but this one is published in a respected science-based journal and is not hysterical. Seriously - if your doctor prescribe one of these, ask if there's an alternative. These should never, ever be prescribed as first-line drugs - they should be reserved for use only after other drugs have failed to treat the infection. And they should never be used in conjunction with a steriod (a commonly prescribed combination, but one that has a greater risk profile than the fluoroquinolone alone).

    https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03267-5
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    Last advice I want to take are from US FDA and CDC after what they did to pain patients. Two corrupt mob syndicates that wanna be involved an every aspect of your health.

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