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Cooking and recipe sharing

Recommended Pharmacies on Pharmacy Reviewer

Joined
Nov 18, 2021
Posts
6
I am a firm believer in the concept of good health starting with a good diet. I am of the opinion that the general health of the nation would improve if cookery was taught in schools again. But I am not a very creative or indeed confident cook. I started buying Hello Fresh boxes and I have to say I have amazed myself with what I can actually do when I have a recipe in front of me. (and all the ingredients conveniently packaged) The only thing I can't do is make meatballs that have the right texture.........


So first of all if anyone fancies giving Hello Fresh a try pm me because they do vouchers which mean both myself and the person trying the box get a discount....

But more important does anyone have any recipes they have tried that worked really well that they could share?
 

tycho

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 8, 2011
Posts
350
I am out of town right now (Happy Thanksgiving to those who observe it!) but recently made a stupid simple yet incredibly delicious red lentil stew. Will locate and post recipe when i get back home. Sounds like it would be just the kind of dish you are looking for.
 

teresita

Exalted member
Joined
Jun 4, 2011
Posts
2,839
This is a great idea for a thread. I belong to misfit market and have just roasted vegetables with olive oil and adobo seasoning, very good. I found that I like squash, who knew, I never bought it.

I'm interested in healthy recipes that take less than 30 minutes to make
 

tycho

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 8, 2011
Posts
350
The red lentil recipe I mentioned above is pretty darn quick, if I recall. I’ll be able to post it in the next day or two. Adobo was my go to for a while, and that lead me to doing lots of things with Hatch Chilis. But right now I am experimenting with berbere seasoning. Delicious!
 

tycho

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 8, 2011
Posts
350
Lentils rock tycho:rock:

Well here ya go @Seychelle: Rock on!

**************

Spicy Ethiopian Red Lentil Stew

4 servings

Ingredients:

2 teaspoons canola oil (or similar)
2 cups chopped red onion (others work fine)
1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger -- feel free to increase this!
3 garlic cloves, minced
3 tablespoons tomato paste
1 ½ tablespoons Berbere spice -- feel free to increase this!
3 cups vegetable broth, or chicken if you prefer
1 cup dried small red lentils
¼ teaspoon salt
¼ cup finely chopped fresh cilantro
4 cups hot cooked rice. Basmati is called for; I last used a mix of wild and brown rice

Directions:

Heat oil in a large Dutch oven over low-to-medium heat. Add onion to pan; cook gently 15 minutes or until tender and translucent, stirring occasionally. Add ginger and garlic; cook 5 minutes, stirring frequently. Stir in tomato paste and Berbere spice; cook 1 minute, stirring to combine. Gradually add broth, stirring until blended - a whisk works well here. Increase heat to medium-high; bring to a simmer.

Rinse lentils until cold water; drain. Add lentils to broth mixture; simmer, partially covered, 35 minutes or until lentils are tender, stirring occasionally. Stir in salt.

Serve over rice, sprinkled with cilantro as garnish.

The Berbere makes this recipe. Heck, Berbere makes =anything=.
 
Last edited:

Chancer

Exalted member
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May 25, 2012
Posts
2,733
I too have started being more health conscious when I put on weight during lockdown. I think a big issue is additives being added to both animal and human food although, the cheap price for 'fast food' is a big problem.

I've been to the US about a dozen times and always actively lost weight before going, I knew I would add it on while eating out (for a holiday is was exciting and fun but, it shouldn't be a daily diet).

Its disgraceful that healthy organic food is so expensive for the average budget (same in the UK). I do buy from small farm stores when I can but my food budget would rise considerably if I did this constantly as my only food source.
I remember having cookery classes at school, I didn't realise they had stopped.

Food tip; Chilli goes with everything 🤣
 

Chancer

Exalted member
Joined
May 25, 2012
Posts
2,733
This is a great idea for a thread. I belong to misfit market and have just roasted vegetables with olive oil and adobo seasoning, very good. I found that I like squash, who knew, I never bought it.

I'm interested in healthy recipes that take less than 30 minutes to make
I'm not a vegetarian but I bought a book with great vegetarian recipes to help with my weight loss. Its called 'The Abel and Cole Veg Box Companion'. Its like an idiots guide to vegetables (which I found really useful 🙃). It has a section for every seasons vegetables and some interesting easy recipes. It might be available online to download?
 

jaders

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Joined
Feb 1, 2012
Posts
3,219
I have many meals that involve roasting veggies in the oven at 425. They cook very fast and taste so much better than any other method (to me anyway.). I do eat vegetarian so I often add chickenless morsels (Trader Joe’s - they rock) or just some Parmesan cheese and put over rice. Usually it’s red and green bell pepper, onion, mushrooms, and zucchini and yellow squash.

Just roasting cauliflower and/or broccoli in the oven makes them magnificent as well, imho. 😃

I discovered this gal on the net a year ago too. Really love a lot of her recipes.

 

tycho

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 8, 2011
Posts
350
Here is the other recipe I mentioned -- the "could be vegan but I never do it that way" Black Bean and Colorful Bell Pepper Chili:

*********************

Black Bean, Red/Orange/Yellow Pepper Chili (With Chorizo if desired!)

This recipe uses canned chipotle chilies in Adobo sauce, which gives this chili a smoky depth. After sampling several versions, I prefer "Embassa" brand canned chipotle chilies in adobo sauce. "San Marco" brand is more tomato-y and less adobo-y, and I prefer the strong adobo flavor of "Embassa." It's easy to find at my local Jewel and Mariano; YMMV.

Garnish the chili with chopped cilantro and green onions, and if approved for your diet, a dollop of sour cream. Serve with a side of corn bread.

YIELD: Makes 6-ish servings

INGREDIENTS

• 6 tablespoons olive oil (Note: you really need only half that amount, or -- better --
see below for using no oil at all and sautéing in the oil from the chorizo)
• OPTIONAL: 1/2 lb Chorizo. Buk from the butcher or Carniceria is best;
the kind in the plastic tube is only "OK..."
• 1 med or large onion, coarsely chopped (about 3 cups) (I typically use Vidalia/Sweet onion but just tried a Red onion and it was fine)
• 2-3 minced cloves of garlic
• 3 large colorful bell peppers, chopped (I use Yellow, Red and Orange)
• 1 and 1/2 tablespoons cumin seeds (or more to taste; 2 is fine, and offers more heat)
• 4 teaspoons minced canned chipotle chilies (or more to taste).
(I've been using lots more of this lately, but that increases the heat. I most recently chopped up 4 peppers
from the can, and added a Tbs. or two of the sauce from the can -- the sauce is the good stuff!)
• Four 15-ounce cans black beans, well drained. I've started using one of the big 50 oz. cans of La Preferida brand.
• One 14 1/2-ounce can diced tomatoes with their juice.
(Original recipe uses less beans (3 cans) and more tomato (2 cans). Our house prefers it 4 to 1.
• 4 cups vegetable (or chicken) broth

PREPARATION

This was originally a vegan recipe. But I had some chorizo on hand that I needed to use up. I added that the very first time I ever made this and have never looked back.

If using chorizo, and if making this in a single heavy stovetop cookware pot (as I do) gently brown the chorizo in the cooking pan, rendering-out the oil from the sausage. Use that oil -- no olive oil likely needed, or add some oil as required -- to sauté the veggies. If you end up with too much chorizo oil for your taste, just remove some.

Whether using olive oil or rendered-out chorizo oil, heat oil in your heavy large pot over medium.

Add onion and garlic. Sauté until onion is soft and golden, stirring frequently, about 10 minutes. Don't let the garlic burn -- in fact, maybe add later to avoid scorching the garlic. Then add the bell pepper, cumin seeds, and the minced chipotle chilies and some of the flavorful adobo juice from their can and stir for a minute. Add black beans, diced tomatoes with juices, and vegetable/chicken broth; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium. Simmer uncovered until liquid is reduced to a level and thickness of your liking, stirring occasionally. For me it takes about 45 minutes to an hour.

NOTE: if you like fresher, crunchier bell peppers, hold-off adding them for perhaps 20-30 minutes. But I find that they hold up pretty well if added as per the directions above.

The original recipe says "season chili to taste with salt and pepper." I've never added any salt because the chorizo likely has plenty. And I don't add pepper because I can't imagine even being able to taste it among the cumin and adobo and chipolte.

ONE MORE NOTE: the original recipe says to "transfer 2 cups chili to processor. Blend to coarse paste; return to pot. Continue to simmer chili to thicken." That's fine if you want that kind of overall consistency, but I find the chili is just fine without doing this step. I never have.
 
Last edited:

Chancer

Exalted member
Joined
May 25, 2012
Posts
2,733
Here is the other recipe I mentioned -- the "could be vegan but I never do it that way" Black Bean and Colorful Bell Pepper Chili:

*********************

Black Bean, Red/Orange/Yellow Pepper Chili (With Chorizo if desired!)

This recipe uses canned chipotle chilies in Adobo sauce, which gives this chili a smoky depth. After sampling several versions, I prefer "Embassa" brand canned chipotle chilies in adobo sauce. "San Marco" brand is more tomato-y and less adobo-y, and I prefer the strong adobo flavor of "Embassa." It's easy to find at my local Jewel and Mariano; YMMV.

Garnish the chili with chopped cilantro and green onions, and if approved for your diet, a dollop of sour cream. Serve with a side of corn bread.

YIELD: Makes 6-ish servings

INGREDIENTS

• 6 tablespoons olive oil (Note: you really need only half that amount, or -- better --
see below for using no oil at all and sautéing in the oil from the chorizo)
• OPTIONAL: 1/2 lb Chorizo. Buk from the butcher or Carniceria is best;
the kind in the plastic tube is only "OK..."
• 1 med or large onion, coarsely chopped (about 3 cups) (I typically use Vidalia/Sweet onion but just tried a Red onion and it was fine)
• 2-3 minced cloves of garlic
• 3 large colorful bell peppers, chopped (I use Yellow, Red and Orange)
• 1 and 1/2 tablespoons cumin seeds (or more to taste; 2 is fine, and offers more heat)
• 4 teaspoons minced canned chipotle chilies (or more to taste).
(I've been using lots more of this lately, but that increases the heat. I most recently chopped up 4 peppers
from the can, and added a Tbs. or two of the sauce from the can -- the sauce is the good stuff!)
• Four 15-ounce cans black beans, well drained. I've started using one of the big 50 oz. cans of La Preferida brand.
• One 14 1/2-ounce can diced tomatoes with their juice.
(Original recipe uses less beans (3 cans) and more tomato (2 cans). Our house prefers it 4 to 1.
• 4 cups vegetable (or chicken) broth

PREPARATION

This was originally a vegan recipe. But I had some chorizo on hand that I needed to use up. I added that the very first time I ever made this and have never looked back.

If using chorizo, and if making this in a single heavy stovetop cookware pot (as I do) gently brown the chorizo in the cooking pan, rendering-out the oil from the sausage. Use that oil -- no olive oil likely needed, or add some oil as required -- to sauté the veggies. If you end up with too much chorizo oil for your taste, just remove some.

Whether using olive oil or rendered-out chorizo oil, heat oil in your heavy large pot over medium.

Add onion and garlic. Sauté until onion is soft and golden, stirring frequently, about 10 minutes. Don't let the garlic burn -- in fact, maybe add later to avoid scorching the garlic. Then add the bell pepper, cumin seeds, and the minced chipotle chilies and some of the flavorful adobo juice from their can and stir for a minute. Add black beans, diced tomatoes with juices, and vegetable/chicken broth; bring to boil. Reduce heat to medium. Simmer uncovered until liquid is reduced to a level and thickness of your liking, stirring occasionally. For me it takes about 45 minutes to an hour.

NOTE: if you like fresher, crunchier bell peppers, hold-off adding them for perhaps 20-30 minutes. But I find that they hold up pretty well if added as per the directions above.

The original recipe says "season chili to taste with salt and pepper." I've never added any salt because the chorizo likely has plenty. And I don't add pepper because I can't imagine even being able to taste it among the cumin and adobo and chipolte.

ONE MORE NOTE: the original recipe says to "transfer 2 cups chili to processor. Blend to coarse paste; return to pot. Continue to simmer chili to thicken." That's fine if you want that kind of overall consistency, but I find the chili is just fine without doing this step. I never have.
Reading your recipe had me reaching for a valium. 🤣

I thought I was clever when I married a chef, now I'm divorced I'm stuffed (not literally obviously 🙃).
I struggle making meals for one. 🤦‍♀️
 

tycho

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 8, 2011
Posts
350
@Chancer I was always the cook in a relationship whether married or not. But when I got divorced a dozen or so years ago, after the obligatory doldrums and funk I got into cooking much more — even though just for one. Leftovers make the effort twice as easy; only need to cook once for several days.

I was/am retired (that happened at a very young and tender age) so it was something to do to fill time.

My gf of 10 years or so who now lives with me is quite the beneficiary and approves the hobby.

Put the Valium down and grab a cookbook!
 

Chancer

Exalted member
Joined
May 25, 2012
Posts
2,733
@Seychelle I've always found men make better cooks. Even growing up my dad was the most dominant cook in the house after coming home from work.
 

totts

Lapsed Senior Member
Joined
Nov 24, 2011
Posts
143
I used to cook a lot but seem to be regressing. My latest plat du jour is instant noodles! 😂 Koreans call them ‘ramen’ but they’re really just instant noodle. They go with anything too… 😁
 

tycho

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 8, 2011
Posts
350
I used to cook a lot but seem to be regressing. My latest plat du jour is instant noodles! 😂 Koreans call them ‘ramen’ but they’re really just instant noodle. They go with anything too… 😁
But man-Oh-man can you tart-up a bowl of instant noodles/ramen! That bowl is the perfect place to toss "whatever is in the fridge that might taste interesting":

- poached egg!
- thin sliced cooked and leftover meat or chicken (or, at this time of year, turkey) that might be lying around
- bean sprouts!
- some kind of flavorful green leafy veggie, like cilantro or arugula
- broccoli, fresh or cooked (cook it in the noodles!)
- artistic spiral squirt of Sriracha hot sauce

A cooking strong point that I am accused of having is spontaneously figuring out what to make for a meal based on my recollection (or after a quick view of the fridge and larder) of what's in the house. Didn't know until 4 pm yesterday afternoon that we were going to have turkey soup for dinner. But I was getting tired of carving smaller and smaller bits from that carcass and I had on hand water, garlic, green onions, small amounts of cilantro and arugula left over from some other project, an onion, celery, carrots, sage, bay leaves, cayenne, fun egg noodles and salt.

Tossed the turkey carcass in a pot with water and let that simmer for an hour while I chopped all the other items. Fished the carcass out and separated the good meat from the skin, bones and other detritus; skimmed the broth to remove floaty icky things; then tossed the good meat and all the other ingredients back in the pot. Came back perhaps an hour and added the noodles. 8 minutes later we had "Non-Instant Noodles!" :)

Not at all hard. But: chopping and prepping -- while stupid easy -- is the most time-consuming part of cooking (for me at least). I wanna be a TV cook where all that stuff is already waiting for me in shiny metal bowls. I try to enlist the GF for that chore but she invariably is on the couch reading while I do all of that. Gender role-reversal from the 1950's in the States... "What's for dinner" she cheekily inquires...
 

David L. Hunt

Senior member
Joined
Dec 6, 2021
Posts
65
Though I did get it of the internet at the time I have adjusted it and now our families favourite and easily made into mini muffins.
350gram of finely chopped butternut squash (leave the peel on, it goes soft and chewy in the oven)
75gram of finely chopped parsnip
300gram of light brown sugar
4 large eggs
300 gram plain flour
2 heaped teaspoons of baking powder
a handful of walnuts (if possible ofcourse, I think it will be fine without too!)
2 teaspoons of cinnamon
175ml oil (any kind does the job)
Put it all together in that order, scoop them in the paper cases in the muffin tin
Oven on 180C for about 20/25 minutes, I always turn them around halve way to get them evenly baked.
Theyre nice warm but I find them even better when kept in the fridge (they keep around a week) this recipe is for around 12 normal size muffins!

Or chocolate orange cupcakes without eggs or dairy
185 gram of all purpose flour
200 gram of dark brown sugar
45 gram of cocoa powder
1 teaspoon of baking soda
1/2 teaspoon of salt
1 cup of orange juice
zest of one orange (at least, can up it to 3 if you like for allot of flavour)
125 ml of oil
2 tablespoons of white or apple vinigar
1 table spoon of vanilla extract
Mix dry and wet ingredients seperate, combine when all is mixed but just gently stir it through, dont overmix!
Bake on 175c for about 16/18 minutes, again turn halveway
This will make about 12 normal size cupcakes

Hope you can do something with this!
 
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