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Expiration Dates on meds

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Chancer

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I keep my medicines a long time and I've used one or two past the expiration date just because I couldn't wait to get a refill. Having said that some of the online meds that we buy have altered expiration dates because nobody is really enforcing these rules overseas like in the US.
Most places are monitored by the WHO and they sell to other Countries with strict guidelines. I've never seen an expiry date over 5 years on my travels although I havnt really paid to close attention. The bigger problem is storage in hot Countries. They won't necessarily have air con, fridges and quality storage we are used to in the West. That can really screw with meds irrelevant of the expiry date.
 

Name taken

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Placing a medication in a cool place, such as a refrigerator, will help a drug remain potent for many years.

Can you put tablets in the fridge safely or is it just liquids meds?
The only problem with using the refrigerator for storage is that it can introduce moisture. I have read that the best storage conditions are room temperature, not too cold or too hot.
 

danis

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Back in the 2019 I helped my brother to "vacate" his colleague's fancy apartment after he sold it. Beside the usual ballast that you'd normally found in this kind of places - clothing, shoes, kitchenware, some lights, electronics and some other personal stuff, I've also stumbled upon 12 blistered 5mg Apaurin (diazepam) coated pills with expired date (2016). Of course I confiscated them for my personal use 'cos they were completely intact, still in original box and blistered and was curious. Worked just fine, although I didn't feel quite the same effect (and feeling) upon taking it as with my prescribed alprazolam (Helex, Xanax) meds. Later I learned about the difference between diazepam and alprazolam, but nonetheless, I would say the pills still did what they were supposed to do. Coated pills are generally speaking more robust and "durable" if stored properly.
 

Chancer

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@danis I didn't think you could get 'coated' diazepam. I've use Apaurin but I don't remember them being coated although it was a few years ago now. Were they SR?
 

danis

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https://i.redd.it/popc38ddrua31.jpg

This is it. I hope I didn' break any rules by borrowing material from another forum. Yes, I've checked the official medical data and the Apaurin (produced by KRKA from Slovenia, diazepam as active substance) is available in 2mg, 5 mg and 10mg doses. 2 and 5 are coated pills, while 10 is regular tablet with a demarcation line. Whether SR or not, I would say not as that would be labeled on the packaging. I broke them in two anyways and they were still very very tough to split them half ways - despite being 3 years past expiration date. You can still get them in Slovenia.
 

CalmSeeker

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@Name taken
I've recently acquired an oral solution of etiz, and I plan on making my own when the bottle runs out. Think I should have the full bottle in the fridge now? It's roughly 300mgs, and I'm not exactly plowing through it, so it's just sitting in a cabinet at the moment.
 

Name taken

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@Name taken
I've recently acquired an oral solution of etiz, and I plan on making my own when the bottle runs out. Think I should have the full bottle in the fridge now? It's roughly 300mgs, and I'm not exactly plowing through it, so it's just sitting in a cabinet at the moment.
The only reason I would probably not do that is if colder temperatures cause the dissolved etiz to precipitate out of solution.
I have never really used solutions myself so I am not really qualified to say if it would keep it more fresh. I know humidity is definitely not a factor.
 

Santa's little helper

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Placing a medication in a cool place, such as a refrigerator, will help a drug remain potent for many years.

Can you put tablets in the fridge safely or is it just liquids meds?
The only problem with using the refrigerator for storage is that it can introduce moisture. I have read that the best storage conditions are room temperature, not too cold or too hot.
Humidors are very effective; given ambient room temp does not fluctuate more than 10F
 

joakim46

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Feb 18, 2013
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Drugs don’t expire:happy: antibiotics maybe but opioids and benzos never!
Are you sure? I guess at least they will start losing potency.
The US Navy done a study and they remained ok for up to 25 years. Be careful with life saving drugs like allergy injections etc.
I was just wondering, I don't pretend to take expired medicine, however I can take an expired benzo without fear. Thank you.
 

sleeper

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Apr 22, 2011
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Placing a medication in a cool place, such as a refrigerator, will help a drug remain potent for many years.

Can you put tablets in the fridge safely or is it just liquids meds?
I did attempt this many years ago and i could not detect any benefit in lifecycle. What i refrigerated was a sealed plastic container with 500 capsules. They seemed to be fresh after, but i don't think it had any benefit. I am now told that refrigeration only makes it worse, due to moisture. I never tried it again.
 

Bearhug

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I have many medications that are way past their expiration, but I'm not afraid to use them when necessary. Very few medications go bad within a few years. As noted in other threads the military has studied this extensively. I have not notice much of a loss of potency in medications that are up to 10 years old if stored properly. My meds are kept in cool, dry and dark conditions. As noted above, I would be wary of storing tablets in a refrigerator due to moisture concerns.
 

cajunbulldog

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I recently took a 4 week supply of american provigal.It was aged some where in late 2008 to early 2009.Stored in pharmacy bottle in a cool and dry place. I took the whole 4 week supply and got all the benefits that are described taking this med. Now I am juggling ordering or pushing dr for a legal script.
 

Chancer

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@cajunbulldog I had to look it up, I didn't recognise the name. I know it as Modafinal (I've never tried it). I've recently started taking Phenibut one or twice a week (never more than twice, its extremely addictive). However, its been invaluable in helping get me motivated and awake and countering my pain meds side effects.

Also Vitamin D (especially D3) can't be underestimated, especially if you live in a Northern Country with limited sunshine. We have a terrible deficiency problem in the UK, North America and Canada etc, even more particularly important if you are a black or olive skin tone. I take them religiously every morning and they really do help.
 

vapestar

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Sep 7, 2014
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125
From my experience, as long as the meds are stored properly or according to label, past the printed expiration date should still be okay. From my understanding, the potency very gradually starts to deteriorate but it would take a very long time for them to become ineffective.
Like started above: store in a dry sealed container, preferably at a cool & dry room temperature. And voila!
-vapestar-
 

danis

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Just follow the instructions on a leaflet of the medicine and you should be good. The moisture, direct exposure to sun and variable temperatures are the worst enemies for any kind of perishable items, especially tablest/pills because of their composition. Some my even be hygroscopic.

Coated pills (dragge, please correct me - pills that resemble a small, hard candy, like in the picture I attached for KRKA Apaurin/Diazepam) are much more resilient IMHO. 3 years expired and they still "exploded" when I tried to half them - still extremely compact.

As long medicine is blistered and/or properly stored in some kind of container there really is no reason to doubt the efficacy and potency when expired.
 
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