Good ole colonoscopy

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Danie

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@AlaskanSkimo, @snowy

It will be over before you know it. Some people, so I've heard are totally out, & don't feel/remember a thing. My FIL, SIL, no big deal, they were OUT. For my husband it was different. I want to lay down, go to sleep, wake up & not remember a thing. So when I have mine, I will be using my FIL or SIL's doctor.

Good luck tomorrow!
 

billyboy

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From personal experience, it is very painful if you are not sedated. It was the worst cramping pain I have ever tolerated.
 

Nickel

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Make sure they use Propofol and not Versed. I've had 4 or 5 of these things and all but the last one were with that stupid Versed crap. I kept waking up halfway through and yeah... the cramps were crazy painful. Propofol put me out in like .03 seconds and I seriously thought I was home in bed when I awoke from the sedation. Surprised to find myself in the recovery room. I think most places have made the switch by now though. I started getting these things 15 years ago and they've come a long way.

I always make them put the needle in my arm. At least 7 nurses tried to hit a vein in my hand and couldn't do it and every time they had to give up and stick it in the crook of my elbow. They hate doing that cause it makes more work for them but that's the breaks, medical folks. Now when they come at me with the needle I just stick out my arm and say "Don't even think about trying my hands."
 

H20shed65

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Glad the whole thing is over!!! They gave me propofol and another one that started with an f..
I remember my hand hurting like heck when they pushed the meds in..I was only able to say "ow"
And then I was out..

Perfect! And this is why you should NEVER hesitate to ask your GI if they plan on using Versed or Propofol. Propofol is FAR SUPERIOR and if your GI is using VERSED, you should ask WHY???

There MAY be a good medical reason, but it's just as likely that old habits die hard and for years Versed was the standard. Propofol, when administered correctly, should leave you without any memory of the procedure. It is super fast acting, and wears off equally as quickly-Both Big Pluses. Some GI's may use Versed out of habit and others may prefer it because it requires a SLIGHTLY lower level of monitoring from an anesthetist than Propofol may, depending on the patient.

In any event, ask AHEAD OF TIME and if your physician insists on Versed, there should be a very good MEDICAL REASON why. ( PS-This DOES NOT INCLUDE- "We always Use That" -" It's Safer" ( For who? Me, the patient? Or you and your staff from being sued because of inadequate monitoring?) or "You don't need Propofol, Versed works great! " ( Yes-Ask them which they would prefer if you were to jam a large hose up their azz? )

Go Propofol and if your physician will not or does not use ever use Propofol for Colonoscopy-Find another. If they give you a legitimate medical reason why VERSED is a safer choice FOR YOU-THE PATIENT-That's a conversation you should have.

:)
 

AlaskanSkimo

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When I asked the Doc what she was going to use.. She actually told me that propofol is her drug of choice.. She was an older Doc and quite sassy.. Cause she mumbled something and said she didn't care what anyone said .. She's the Doc and she knows what works...then she quickly smiled and winked and told me she would see me in the procedure room..
I just nodded my head..lol


Perfect! And this is why you should NEVER hesitate to ask your GI if they plan on using Versed or Propofol. Propofol is FAR SUPERIOR and if your GI is using VERSED, you should ask WHY???

There MAY be a good medical reason, but it's just as likely that old habits die hard and for years Versed was the standard. Propofol, when administered correctly, should leave you without any memory of the procedure. It is super fast acting, and wears off equally as quickly-Both Big Pluses. Some GI's may use Versed out of habit and others may prefer it because it requires a SLIGHTLY lower level of monitoring from an anesthetist than Propofol may, depending on the patient.

In any event, ask AHEAD OF TIME and if your physician insists on Versed, there should be a very good MEDICAL REASON why. ( PS-This DOES NOT INCLUDE- "We always Use That" -" It's Safer" ( For who? Me, the patient? Or you and your staff from being sued because of inadequate monitoring?) or "You don't need Propofol, Versed works great! " ( Yes-Ask them which they would prefer if you were to jam a large hose up their azz? )

Go Propofol and if your physician will not or does not use ever use Propofol for Colonoscopy-Find another. If they give you a legitimate medical reason why VERSED is a safer choice FOR YOU-THE PATIENT-That's a conversation you should have.

:)
 

Shayna

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@H20shed65 - I apologize for being slightly off topic here, but why do you think they used Versed vs. Propofol on my lumbar epidurals? The last one I had, I was awake the whole time and felt everything. :(
 

H20shed65

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@H20shed65 - I apologize for being slightly off topic here, but why do you think they used Versed vs. Propofol on my lumbar epidurals? The last one I had, I was awake the whole time and felt everything. :(

Hi Shayna-

I have not worked in Ortho, so this is not a procedure I have seen performed often in person, but I am familiar with it. I think typically a local anesthetic is always the first choice of most physicians for this procedure. If a patient requests additional sedation, I think Versed and Fentanyl are the standards here. Propofol is an anethesthic, it does not relieve pain, but rather works by sedating the patient. Whereas, Versed is a Benzodiazepine to help relax the patient, and Fentanyl is a narcotic pain reliever.

Although there is some controversy here, many physicians feel propofol should be used only under the guidance of an Anesthetist, whether that be another M.D. or specially trained Nurse Anesthetist; some do not. This adds another layer of both potential problems for the patient as well as additional costs and recovery time. Most physicians prefer local anesthetics whenever possible-This reduces complications, cost, procedure time and additional risks. This has to be balanced with patient comfort as well, so it's often a judgement call. From what I understand of lumbar epidurals, this is a fairly short procedure ( time wise ) and perhaps for that reason propofol would not be an appropriate choice here.

Again, this is not a field I work in, so I am guessing here. Anyone here who has worked in orthopedics likely could give you a more definitive answer. :)
 

Ocean View

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So.... I'm scheduled for a colonoscopy this Friday :( :(
Does anyone have any tips.. Besides staying close to the bathroom??
Thanks, Kat

I will get another colonoscopy next month 4.5 years ago they found colon cancer, I have been fighting that and the Mets (cancer) to the Bladder. Don't worry though 97% of people either don't have cancer , or if caught early it can be taken out completely. I fell into the 3% that is still fighting.

I have been recently getting horrible stomach pain for about three months every 4-8 days . it lasts 4-10 hours and is a solid 10+++ in Pain. When I took the ambulance to the hospital, the nurse confused me with someone seeking drugs, which tell me never go to the hospital again for this, as she actually gave me less pain medication then I had at home.

I am so looking forward to this simple process, compared with what I have been through, so we can figure out what causes the pain, and how to get rid of it. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~Then we will fix the (para-stoma) parastomal hernia, if the surgeon thinks he can safely open me again after 4 major operations all cut in the same place. A lot of scar tissue builds up inside you as well as the outside, which we never think about. ( surgeons needs something to sew together, and scar tissue wont work.)

Good luck with your procedure, it will be a memory soon, and no need to be concerned, a routine process. ( I guess you could say I lost my ass after the cancer operation, so we will go through the stoma..) Actually still have one, just not using!

- - - Updated - - -

Edit to add Good job!

Glad the whole thing is over!!! They gave me propofol and another one that started with an f..
I remember my hand hurting like heck when they pushed the meds in..I was only able to say "ow"
And then I was out..
 
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SpaceMatters

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Glad the whole thing is over!!! They gave me propofol and another one that started with an f..
I remember my hand hurting like heck when they pushed the meds in..I was only able to say "ow"
And then I was out..

Hi @AlaskanSkimo , did the doc say if they found any polyps?

First time I had mine, they found 5 I think. 2nd time they found zero. So now I get to go 5 years in-between, instead of three.
 

AlaskanSkimo

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Oops... I did forget to mention.. The Doc said she removed a minuscule polyp..but she didn't mention when or if I had to do it again anytime soon.. She did state she was going to send the polyp out to be tested though...


Hi @AlaskanSkimo , did the doc say if they found any polyps?

First time I had mine, they found 5 I think. 2nd time they found zero. So now I get to go 5 years in-between, instead of three.
 

SpaceMatters

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@AlaskanSkimo , I believe you will get a letter with a picture of the polyp (icky) and the conclusion of the lab report which tests the polyp for cancer. But even if it is precancerous or whatever, since it was removed, you are aok. That's is what is so great about this test.

The letter will give you the recommended # of years b4 the next one. My money's on 5.

Well done friend. This is truly a lifesaving test.
 

Shayna

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And it really depends on your history and what is found....

I had my first and only test at 40, in 2009. But I have a personal history of bowel disease as well as in my family tree.

I never got a letter or test results, or any icky pictures. I think about 10 areas were biopsied and sent off, and I never heard anything back. I am still a patient of this dr., and in fact I saw him again last week, so it's not like they don't know me.

Either way, despite the awful prep it is a valuable and relatively easy test to endure (once the prep is over, of course!).
 

Call

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I guess all places are different but I worried a bit for no reason. I went in, was put to sleep (was given no option) & woke up & it was done. A bit drowsy but left in an hour. Day before was not great but really nothing. Good luck.
 

mongoose

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Hi @AlaskanSkimo I am glad your procedure went well. Seriously, is that not one MAJOR concern completely off your mind? I mean, really, what a relief, would you not agree?

I am glad they gave you the propofol (sp?). They used that on me the last time and it was night and day (almost literally) compared to the versed from my procedure six years ago. Quite a drug, would you not agree? My anesthesiologist told me when he was going to push and to count down from ten. I said ten and next thing I know I was wide awake in the recovery room feeling perfectly normal, but as though absolutely no time had passed.

Actually, and this is for everybody, does anyone actually know how long the procedure takes? My first with the versed I was not "out" and watched the whole thing on the monitor, which I actually found rather fascinating. But I do not know if it was ten minutes or an hour. My second as I already said seemed like it did not even happen.

Now I pretty much always say this on colonoscopy related threads, but everybody, if you do not already know, do not do what I did.

After my first one I wanted to reward myself for my "bravery" (as I was absolutely terrified) so I went and got, well, a large, rather high fat meal. What a mistake that was. I got distended and could not get comfortable in any position for the rest of the day. It was actually worse than the prep now that I think of it. The prep is more annoying than anything else, but it does not hurt. Shoving that big meal down and the consequences...that hurt and all day.

So now you can sit back and bask in the fact that you know for sure, right now that you are fine "in that area" which is really important.

And the cool thing is the next one you will not even be nervous about at all. Wait, I take that back, if I still have @billyboy's story in my head, I might be a little nervous (that was such a horrible story).

Congratulations, welcome to the club.

Kind regards,

mongoose
 

AlaskanSkimo

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@SpaceMatters Thankyou for allowing me to realize.. To count my blessings :) :) it's hard sometimes to imagine that there is a lot of people that can't get this done... But that's the stark reality of the world we live in...
When I had my first mammogram 3 weeks ago.. I wasn't nervous at all.. I felt in a way.. Honered I had the ability to get that one completed as well...
 

jcee

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Colonoscopies every three years C:> here. Pre-op preperation is downright unpleasent (menu: a shitty low fiber diet for two days, then day before the Op pre-op meds: pissing out my ar se for a day to clean everything out) but it gets easier every time. Last few procedures found polyps, which is confronting given a family history of colon cancer, but reassuring ultimately that monitoring for colon cancer is an effective treatment.

My gastroenterologist works with an anesthetist, so am sedated for the whole procedure ( <--- aim for a specialist who will arrange sedation ). Propofol is the anasthetic / sedative she uses, and is most enjoyable for the 1 or 2 seconds that i can remember it being administered ...

Last time i was told the procedure would take about 20mins: from the time i went 'under' to the time i woke up in recovery, about 35-40mins had elapsed.

Having seen colon cancer end someone elses life the long, painful, protracted way, i can definately recommend regular colonoscopy monitoring as an alternative offering better odds.

- jcee
 
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Diversion

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I appreciate the experiences shared on this thread. I am approaching 50, and will have to go thru this soon. My mother has had lots of Polups, so I expect to be checked regularly.

Thanks,

Tom
 
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