Graphic Novels

Recommended Pharmacies on Pharmacy Reviewer

ArtyBowieFan

Lapsed Senior Member
Joined
Dec 25, 2015
Posts
375
About 3 years ago I got into graphic novels - not Superman - but adult based stuff. Vertigo is a particularly good publisher. I've enjoyed these books as much as any in my life, good stories, guts 'n' gore, adult themes etc.

A few to recommend: Sandman, Fables, Preacher, Scalped, Maus, (Anything Neil Gaiman or Garth Ennis), Y the Last Man, 100 Bullets, Hellblazer. There are loads more but these are modern classics.
 

Pacarb915

Member
Joined
Dec 10, 2017
Posts
29
Akira (Katsuhiro Otomo) and Lone Wolf and Cub (Goseki Kojima) are both hugely influential masterpieces from Japan. Lone Wolf and Cub in particular influenced a lot of Western artists (like Frank Miller). Domu: A Child's Dream (also from Otomo) is short but superb.
 

Captain Planet

Honorable member
Joined
Jun 7, 2011
Posts
330
About 3 years ago I got into graphic novels - not Superman - but adult based stuff. Vertigo is a particularly good publisher. I've enjoyed these books as much as any in my life, good stories, guts 'n' gore, adult themes etc.

A few to recommend: Sandman, Fables, Preacher, Scalped, Maus, (Anything Neil Gaiman or Garth Ennis), Y the Last Man, 100 Bullets, Hellblazer. There are loads more but these are modern classics.

I read Sandman in junior high, and nearly 20 years later, I still re-read it on a regular basis. I consider Sandman to be like the War and Peace of comics.
 

Dale123

Banned
Joined
Apr 24, 2018
Posts
20
Batman: The Man Who Laughs ---------- This short story recalls the first meeting between The Joker and Batman. It gives great details concerning the characters of Batman, Gordon and The Joker with respects to the outer world. What I mean by this is while Year One and The Killing Joke give origins of the characters and what goes on in their mind, "The Man Who Laughs" shows how they interact with others.

Batman: The Killing Joke ---------- The fact that Alan Moore wrote this should be a big enough reason for you to read this. This is basically the origin story of the Joker. I would recommend, in case you're wondering, reading this after "The Man Who Laughs", as the latter will intrigue your mind and cause you to want to read The Killing Joke (plus the story is mostly flashbacks so the origin isn't really taking place in the present). While this is actually one of the least impressive Alan Moore stories in my opinion, it is one of the best Batman stories.


Batman: Turning Points ----------- This is usually an overlooked graphic novel focusing on the relationship between Gordon and Batman. Along with overlooked, this novel tends to get below par ratings. While I won't say that the novel deserves better reviews, I will say that it is worth the read as it portrays one of the most important relationships in the Batman storylines. Don't expect the best, but it is well worth it.

Batman: The Long Halloween ----------- This is the best Batman graphic novel. It is essentially a detective story that will keep you intrigued. While it most likely won't have you "guessing who did it", the ending is a bit suprising to say the least. But apart from the great writing (the original comic took place over a year so the novel is quite thick), it gives valuable information regarding the transformation of Harvey Dent into Two-Face. You'll also see cameos from The Joker, Solomon Grundy, Catwoman, Calendar Man, Penguin, Riddler, Poison Ivy, Scarecrow and Mad Hatter.


Batman: Dark Victory --------- This is the follow up story to The Long Halloween and finds Batman trying to stop another holiday killer (as in The Long Halloween). It also displays the following destruction of Two-Face. While this isn't as good as it's predessor, it is a tremendous read and might as well be read after The Long Halloween.


The Dark Knight Returns: This graphic novel takes place in the future and is basically a good read. It, along with The Watchmen, is generally thought of as the best Graphic Novel ever (I disagree, but it is most definately worth the read)



After this I think it's pretty much up to you and what you want to read. Obviously there will be some Graphic novels that you'll need previous information to completely understand, but I think I pretty much covered the essentials. Some would recommend "A Death In The Family" (covering the death of the second Robin, Jason Todd), others would say "Knightfall" (which follows the breaking physically and mentally of Batman), while others would recommend "No Man's Land" (which emphasizes Gotham as a character itself). Whatever you do, however, don't buy into the Graphic Novel "Hush". It is an over-rated piece of crap that has villains popping up for no reason. If you have to read it, check it out at the library when you're bored.
 
Top