I hardly ever read fiction

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Khali

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I may be considered a nerd. However, I rarely read a book that is fiction. I like facts. My favorite book is the Bible - speak truth, life. It certainly is a living book.
I also read text books & anything else that teaches me something. I do not seek entertainment, I seek knowledge. The facts Jack. LoL
My husband jokes that I will be one of the smartest people to die. Haha, isn't he funny.
I like a variety of knowledge. I plan to homeschool our child and maybe from there I can even tutor or teach online. Education and real information is my passion. As well as all natural things :)
Any other nerds on this forum?
 

Maximus

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I cant stand reading fiction. I have so many books on all kinds of subjects. Its useful information. Genetics, pharmacy, architecture, construction. The bible is one of them. That is an entirely different world to get a degree in that. I mean to have a doctorates degree in religion, I could talk to those people all day. Scientists, biology, chemistry, algebra....I just love all the knowledge. We are not geeks, we are problem solvers. We want to understand how things work.
 

teresita

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I love to read all sorts of books. Yes I like reading non fiction, mostly biographies and self help although the Bible is my main coffee table book. Every day, I randomly open it up and read what pops up to see if there is a message I can use. I've done that for about 30 years.

I used to keep up with the Alex Cross, Kay scarpetta and Sue Grafton alphabet books with Kinsey Milhone but they were books I passed back and forth with my mom. Since she's been gone I kind of lost interest but have read a couple of them.

I love pioneer and turn of the century tales, hard lives. My husband doesn't like my pleasure novels, if he reads fiction, it's too deep for me.

Nice to meet readers of all sorts. I'd love to see lists of books you guys would recommend.
 

toby

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For those who don't like 'reading fiction', keep in mind that the bulk of movies, plays, and even music are forms of fiction. All popular television that is not news (well, I take that back, we are now in the era of explicitly 'fake news') or documentaries, etc., is also fiction. I've also read tons of fiction all my life, love much of it, and have published 3 books of it. So I'm hopeless here, but the thread is already interesting.

I like non-fiction too. I read the Bible all the way through once, and there was an attempt to raise me religiously, but it failed mostly. I just go to church to be in the tranquility (I'm Catholic, so I get the prettiest churches too--why, they're almost fictional like a stage set sometimes.) I like the Old Testament the best, esp. I and II Kings and I and II Chronicles. These are history for me, and I definitely love history. But all those sinners in their 'worship in the high places' in Kings--great stuff. Lots of blood 'n' guts and sex.

What I wish I liked more is MANUALS and MECHANICAL FIX-IT things. I can force myself to do them when absolutely necessary, but I always am afraid I'll screw things up anyway, and I do often enough. But non-fiction as on politics and religion, definitely, or the CIA, NSA, etc., love all that when it comes out. @terisita I'd love to see lists of books you guys would recommend. Me too--I'd like to see your titles and your hubby's 'too deep novels'.
 
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Khali

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I cant stand reading fiction. I have so many books on all kinds of subjects. Its useful information. Genetics, pharmacy, architecture, construction. The bible is one of them. That is an entirely different world to get a degree in that. I mean to have a doctorates degree in religion, I could talk to those people all day. Scientists, biology, chemistry, algebra....I just love all the knowledge. We are not geeks, we are problem solvers. We want to understand how things work.

:D yes, problem solvers. I will certainly use that.
I also like a lot of different subjects. Genetics, a FAVORITE for this farm gal!
Oh & to have a degree in religion... goal of mine when we have internet access with a laptop! My husband and I both have passion for spreading the Word & understand teachers are held accountable for false teachings. I want to soak up as much as humanly possible! I have television programs going 24/7 in this household. (We are in the sticks, LoL)
 

Khali

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For those who don't like 'reading fiction', keep in mind that the bulk of movies, plays, and even music are forms of fiction. All popular television that is not news (well, I take that back, we are now in the era of explicitly 'fake news') or documentaries, etc., is also fiction. I've also read tons of fiction all my life, love much of it, and have published 3 books of it. So I'm hopeless here, but the thread is already interesting.

I like non-fiction too. I read the Bible all the way through once, and there was an attempt to raise me religiously, but it failed mostly. I just go to church to be in the tranquility (I'm Catholic, so I get the prettiest churches too--why, they're almost fictional like a stage set sometimes.) I like the Old Testament the best, esp. I and II Kings and I and II Chronicles. These are history for me, and I definitely love history. But all those sinners in their 'worship in the high places' in Kings--great stuff. Lots of blood 'n' guts and sex.

What I wish I liked more is MANUALS and MECHANICAL FIX-IT things. I can force myself to do them when absolutely necessary, but I always am afraid I'll screw things up anyway, and I do often enough. But non-fiction as on politics and religion, definitely, or the CIA, NSA, etc., love all that when it comes out. @terisita I'd love to see lists of books you guys would recommend. Me too--I'd like to see your titles and your hubby's 'too deep novels'.

Interesting reply, much enjoyed.
I hadn't mentioned television... we don't watch movies for the most part, and do for entertainment purposes when we do. Television we watch a wide variety of everything really. I am a reality show fan, love to binge watch when I have sick day or just a shut down day. I call it "controlled drama" because I can change the channel when I have had enough.
I have fictional things that I like to indulge in from time to time... Game of Thrones being one of those.
I am typing on my phone, I cannot see much of what I am writing & it's hard to reply all that I wanted to
 

Khali

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I love to read all sorts of books. Yes I like reading non fiction, mostly biographies and self help although the Bible is my main coffee table book. Every day, I randomly open it up and read what pops up to see if there is a message I can use. I've done that for about 30 years.

I used to keep up with the Alex Cross, Kay scarpetta and Sue Grafton alphabet books with Kinsey Milhone but they were books I passed back and forth with my mom. Since she's been gone I kind of lost interest but have read a couple of them.

I love pioneer and turn of the century tales, hard lives. My husband doesn't like my pleasure novels, if he reads fiction, it's too deep for me.

Nice to meet readers of all sorts. I'd love to see lists of books you guys would recommend.

Yes! :) we need to recommend our favorites. I love promoting reading and learning. In fact, I send out anonymous care packages to people in my area... sometimes people need to know someone cares
(apologies for rambling, I get lost on my tiny screen... with a toddler & husband demanding my attention)
 

teresita

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I'll start with a fictional story about a pioneer woman based on true conditions of the era. It's called Dory. I can't remember the author but it's a quick read with history information I have never known.
For biographies "It's only a Movie" about Alfred Hitchcock. A must read for Hitch fans.
The longest book I have read is "Atlas Shrugged" Great book although Ayn Rand could have shortened it by probably 400 pages of deep description and thoughts. This book was written in the 30s I think but it's pertinence to today's economics is uncanny.
For Bible readers, the Joel Osteen books are real feel good books. I know a lot of people are against him but he is spiritually uplifting to me. I don't care if he's a gazillionaire.
Other books I have read and reread are Gone with the Wind, To Kill a Mockingbird and Grapes of Wrath.
I have read many BIOS of silver screen actors, love reading about their lives.
Who's next? I may not some down for reference
 

davidpaul

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Well, I write fiction sometimes, and to me I try and provide some entertainment, but mainly just a little getaway from life for a moment. If the writer can make you feel the way the characters do, or even better can put you into the mix, and you feel almost as if you are living what you are reading, that's the main goal,to me.

It's not necessarily to learn facts and build knowledge, that's what non fiction is for, yet I would say a lot of fictional writing is based on true happenings. It's up to the writer to bring the reader into the story , seeing and feeling the emotions involved, and if that doesn't happen, then it's a bust and fiction isn't fun anymore.

I'm not biased as to fiction vs. non fiction, everything has it's place and reason for being, you, me, and even fiction and non fiction.LOL
 

toby

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@davidpaul Yes, lots, if not most fiction, is autobiographical or semi-autobiographical, but written in a tone that is different. The most near-literal are like the 'auto-fiction' of Knausgaard's Min Kimp, which I read the first three of. He's very good, and I recommend Vol. II especially, but didn't care to finish it (it's not quite as up there with the whole Proust, and I think he knows that--I took 2 months in 2000 to read all of Recherches in English, then read La Cote des Guermantes, which was my favourite one, in French--my French is not good enough to read fast enough, so I reread favourite parts, as I've also done with some of Robbe-Grillet's novels.) I just read most of Michel Houellebecq's novels, which range from uneven to masterpieces (at least twice) and he often has a 'Michel' or even a 'Michel Houellebecq' in his fiction. Proust had 'Marcel' and Knausgaard was exactly as in real life, the others not quite so literal.

It goes the other way too. Joan Didion's The White Album essays are so overcast in dark atmosphere, it almost seems as though the real places she talks about are pure fiction--and they're not, because I went to one of her readings, and at the Q & A, asked some questions about the addresses and she told me what had happened to them since she'd written them (one was supposed to be demolished, but has in fact been renovated and the neighborhood upgraded. She also told me the address of this house, it was 7406 Franklin Ave., Hollywood, and I went to see it the following Dec., 2001.) So, had to do with her often-depressed mood at the time. Quite a gal in her day, now old and very frail.

But real non-fiction like Ted Koeppel's book on the dangers of cyberwarfare to the electrical grids I had to get my hands on immediately, and that's become an even more important subject since the book's publication almost 2 years ago. Had loved Lawrence Wright's book The Looming Tower (about Al Qaeda and 9/11) and his 2012 book about Scientology is fabulous.

@teresita Love it that you read Hollywood bios, I've read a few, not as many as you, I think. I read one about Lana Turner and one about Ann-Margret 20 and 30 years ago. One about Bobby Darin and Sandra Dee by their son (this one was very good, called Dream Lovers. Dee was still alive at the time, about 1995.) Also have read fine things by Aileen Bowzer, formerly of Museum of Modern Art, about silent director D.W. Griffith, those are excellent. She lives right around the corner from me, and still gets around. The Nature of the Beast, about the director Fritz Lang, who did Metropolis and the Dr. Mabuse silents before coming to Hollywood, is excellent too, and he truly was a monster.
 
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Raspberry

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I used to be a giant bookworm and I read plenty of fiction. I have many favorites but I like Children's literature. The classic favorites like Wizard of Oz and Chronicles of Narnia and Harry Potter of course. I didn't even read the whole series. There was one that wasn't very good and I lost interest but I heard the rest of the series was good.

I like non-fiction also and memoirs.

Has anybody read "A Million Little Pieces" by James Frey? It is drug related but it was a big fraud. It was funny at the time because it was an Oprah recommended book and when it was discovered that it was a pack of lies Oprah was up in arms. That was a fiasco but I found it very amusing. I liked the book and I believed it was real but when I found out it wasn't I realized how obviously fake it was. I used to like biographys and memoirs. Sometimes I would read as many biographies on a person that I could find, to compare stories and try to get the real truth..I read anything I could get my hands on that would keep me entertained. I can't read anymore or very little. Something changed and I can't do it anymore. I can read bits of this and that and research topics. I still buy books sometimes but I like e-books simply because they don't take up so much room.
 

Khali

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Bibliophage; an avid reader; a bookworm
From the Greek:
biblio = book + phage = eat
Literally, "a devourer of books"
 
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dame

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I too almost never read fiction, and I read a lot. Gave up on it 10-15 years ago when I read a sequence of so-called critically acclaimed and award-winning books that I just hated. I got burned, did a 180, and have almost never read fiction since. Can't stomach those "modern novels" where NOTHING. HAPPENS. AT. ALL. Plus, what they say is true: Truth is stranger! I do still like the occasional short story, sci-fi, or historical novel (have you guys read Killer Angels? I couldn't believe how much I enjoyed it.) I still like a lot of the classics, too.

I like a good travel read, adventure/exploration tales, nature stories, real-life mysteries, etc. Well-written nonfiction can be every bit as escapist as fiction. For a good travel read, I'd recommend anything by Tim Cahill or Bill Bryson. Confederates in the Attic is a fun travel-plus-history book about a man's quest to "experience" the Civil War.

For nature-y books, I recommend Desert Solitaire, The Story of Brutus, and A Wolf Called Romeo.

Memoirs: West with the Night, The Glass Castle, The Solace of Open Spaces, AWOL on the Appalachian Trail.

Adventure: Endurance, Into Thin Air, Lost in the Kingdom of Ice. History: The Worst Hard Time, The Last Stand by Philbrick, Astoria by Peter Stark. And for a truly WEIRD tale about a crazy dude & his family in Alaska -- Pilgrim's Wilderness.

p.s. I almost never watch TV or movies, either. I like a good independent documentary on PBS now and again, however!
 
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mancman

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I read all kinds of stuff...History, military, religion....My favourite fiction authors would include:
Graham Green, Albert Camus, Sartre, Celine, Kafka, Orwell, Kerouac, Hemingway....
Having traveled widely I've met a lot of people (and preachers) who could quote the bible all day but didn't read or know much about anything else....
 

toby

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@mancman, great 'short-list'. Think Death on the Installment Plan is fantastic, and Hemingway is inimitable. I've never read Grahame Greene somehow. Although I'm glad to have read several of Kafka's masterpieces, I admire them more than love them, but god knows they're original, with Gregor Samsa and K. And how could we even get through eternity without Orwell? I like a lot of Kerouac too. Sartre more for admiring than loving too, but Huis Clos is amazing.
 

mancman

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@toby Yes Celine...I've read all his stuff - it just flows and comes from pure experience....Graham Greene is excellent - 'The Quiet American', 'The Heart of The Matter', 'Our Man In Havana'.....Kafka amazing...Recently revisited Orwell - '1984'....Favourite Kerouac is 'Desolation Angels'.
'Darkness at Noon' by Arthur Koestler is one of my favourite novels.I also like Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn
Non-fiction all of Christopher Hitchens...
Also just read Nixonland & Legacy of Ashes:The History of the CIA
Have to check out Huis Clos
 

djrick

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@dame


What a great recommendation, Confederates in the Attic! Such an enjoyable, fun read.

Confederates in the Attic is a work of non-fiction by Pulitzer Prize-winning author Tony Horwitz.


I read a variety, whatever looks like it might interest me. Great recommendation, Killer Angels. I've read it but it has been some time ago. Also Gods and Generals and there is another one, Civil War era IIRC, by the same author. Read them all but the Pulitzer Prize winning Killer Angels will stick with a person some time after finishing it. Remarkable book.

Currently reading:

The Witches: Suspicion, Betrayal, and Hysteria in 1692 Salem

Pulitzer Prize winner Stacy Schiff, author of the #1 bestseller Cleopatra, provides an electrifying, fresh view of the Salem witch trials.


I particularly favor John Connolly, Irish author of the Charlie Parker series in mystery fiction. Great reads, great Irish angst.
 

smo1959

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Cant believe I missed missed this thread when it started...! I prefer non fiction but I read plenty of fiction too. I read a lot of spiritual, mostly Christian, books. I'm not Catholic, but I am very interested in the lives of the saints and Christian mysticism...Thomas Merton and some of the more contemporary practitioners of contemplative prayer. I've read quite a few books about prayer and meditation from the Buddhist tradition and other Eastern traditions also. I've read many of Joyce Myers' books... I'm all over the place. Guess I'm on a quest...

The internet and the vast amount of information, books, blogs, and everything else could keep me occupied indefinitely. I don't watch a lot of television but I have really been enjoying The Crown on Netflix...after watching an episode last night, I spent at least 2 hours reading about the history of the House of Windsor. I wanted to see how factual the series actually is and also get a better understanding of the British monarchy in the 20th century. And that's how it goes for me. I feel like a sponge, but I just have a relentless desire to know and understand. Always been like that - glad to know I'm not alone! The down sides for me at this point in life are "so many books, so little time" and the fact that I cant retrieve the information as well as I used to after I read it! :bigsmile:
 
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