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Sick of docs forcing us to do what we do

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LightUser99

Senior member
Joined
Jan 5, 2018
Posts
118
i have a broken bone and my ortho told me to take a NASID. Told him I can’t even sleep it hurts so bad and that’s not cutting it. He said, well - you can alternate with Tylenol. And give us a call if your stomach starts bleeding from too much nasid. What the actual?
 

jaders

Exalted member
Joined
Feb 1, 2012
Posts
2,669
i have a broken bone and my ortho told me to take a NASID. Told him I can’t even sleep it hurts so bad and that’s not cutting it. He said, well - you can alternate with Tylenol. And give us a call if your stomach starts bleeding from too much nasid. What the actual?

I fractured my wrist recently and definitely was not treated like that! But I received the most help from my pcp. Have you tried asking your primary? They “know” you so you might get better help there. That’s so screwed up!!!
 

nobknee

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Posts
286
i have a broken bone and my ortho told me to take a NASID. Told him I can’t even sleep it hurts so bad and that’s not cutting it. He said, well - you can alternate with Tylenol. And give us a call if your stomach starts bleeding from too much nasid. What the actual?
Your doctor is a prick and I would fire him.

You only fire an employee that you're prepared to replace. NSAIDS-only is becoming very common practice with dental surgery and broken bones. It's beginning to creep into post-op care and even into cancer treatment---the ones who used to be regarded as "deserving" of pain treatment, even by anti-opioid zealots.

NSAIDS-only goes back to a University of Minnesota study known as the "Krebs study," which concluded that OTC pain relievers work just as well as opioids. It had some massive problems, not the least of which is that the participants had an average pain score of 4. I've had menstrual cramps that were worse than a 4. Of course, with levels that modest, NSAIDS will work just as well as opioids (if not better---I get no relief for menstrual cramps from opioids, but ibuprofen works like a charm).

A more recent study out of Baylor found a loose correlation between long-term prescription opioids (now, just ASSUMED, even in the scientific literature, to be A Bad Thing) and a whole laundry list of things that are so disparate, it sort of proves its own meaninglessness: Being over the age of 50 (duh!), being on Medicaid (because that's what a lot of disabled adults are on!), and having undergone chemotherapy, particularly for breast cancer.

In both the Krebs and Baylor studies, these issues are pointed out in peer review, if not in the researchers' own acknowledgment of the limitations of their conclusions. There's not necessarily anything "wrong" with either study, if interpreted within the limitations of their conclusions. (Well,ok....Krebs was pushing it...I've seen better work from graduate students.)

But this is what the upcoming generation of doctors has been schooled in: Opioids are bad and dangerous. NSAIDs have been proven to work just as well. And now even cancer is under the microscope for the dreaded "long-term opioid use."

I don't know how many of the older generation actually believe this shit, versus how many of them are just spineless pussies.
It also varies quite a lot between different states, and sometimes between different cities or facilities within the same state.

Either way, this is the direction it's headed. Fire your doctor, and you may find yourself without one. Pretty soon, all the spineless pussies will have retired or died, and all we'll have left are doctors who have never known pain medicine to be practiced any other way.
 
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Cinderella1

Exalted member
Joined
Jul 20, 2011
Posts
4,455
I fractured my ankle in two places 3 1/2 years ago. The x-rays and CT scan show that it has healed but I am still in pain. My doctor, the ortho, sent me to a pain medication doctor because he said with his license he is unable to give me anything stronger than Tramadol. Because of Colvin I hadn't even had to go in person to the pain doctor what everything was done as a telemed visit. I have to go there in person on Tuesday though and haven't been since April. They have just been refilling my hydrocodone. I'm wondering because it is almost a year that I have been seeing them if they are going to try to get me off medication. Still don't know what we are doing about my ankle but I have to go to get an MRI because when I saw the surgeon he said but even though there is nothing wrong with the bone it might be ligaments tendons or possibly even nerve. I had been getting progressively worse and now I can't even use my Walker to go to the doctor but my son takes me in the wheelchair. I just hope I can still see this Pain Care Specialists because he and his staff are just so understanding.
 

nobknee

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Posts
286
I fractured my ankle in two places 3 1/2 years ago. The x-rays and CT scan show that it has healed but I am still in pain. My doctor, the ortho, sent me to a pain medication doctor because he said with his license he is unable to give me anything stronger than Tramadol.

I'm pretty sure this is bullshit. There's no licensing issue I'm aware of that precludes doctors from prescribing particular medications. There's the DEA number, but if he didn't have one of those, he couldn't prescribe Tramadol either, because at some point, Tramadol became a naughty drug too.

Rule of Thumb = Today's Go-To Med will be tomorrow's Naughty Drug.

Docs love to say that. "Oh, I'd lose my license!" But virtually NO doctors have lost their licenses for prescribing opioids. A handful have lost their DEA numbers (usually a temporary suspension), and an even smaller handful have been targeted by law enforcement. But most of them are just pulling this out of their assholes because they don't WANT to prescribe opioids. They don't WANT to be the one among their colleagues to say, "Y'know....this is all getting pretty overblown and fucked up...dontcha think?"

I hate to say it, but brace for the possibility that you'll get cut off. Better prepared than not! Especially if this is an intractable problem with your ankle. The writing on the wall is pretty clear that no one is going to be allowed to stay on opioids long-term, not even for incurable conditions and regardless of daily pain levels.

When they came for the cancer patients, I realized that what I thought would be rock-bottom is not rock-bottom.
 

jakemoe

Eminent member
Joined
Mar 2, 2013
Posts
1,125
@cinderella I know what you mean when you talk about your doctor saying he can't do this or that because he could lose his license. There have been so many times I have heard that from my doctor and I know he's lying, or sometimes exaggerating but of course I can't tell him he's lying because then he will hate me and cut me off entirely. It's such a baby's game and it's so tiring that I hate it and want to punch him in the face. These guys must think we are complete idiots to lie to our faces like they do. Anyway I'm glad your son helps you with your travel to your appointments and the staff at the pain clinic is so understanding. That's pretty huge.

It's Christmas!! Happy Christmas everyone!! 🎅🎅🎅🎄🎄🎄🌟🌟🌟☃️☃️☃️
 

nobknee

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Posts
286
@cinderella I know what you mean when you talk about your doctor saying he can't do this or that because he could lose his license. There have been so many times I have heard that from my doctor and I know he's lying, or sometimes exaggerating but of course I can't tell him he's lying because then he will hate me and cut me off entirely. It's such a baby's game and it's so tiring that I hate it and want to punch him in the face. These guys must think we are complete idiots to lie to our faces like they do. Anyway I'm glad your son helps you with your travel to your appointments and the staff at the pain clinic is so understanding. That's pretty huge.

It's Christmas!! Happy Christmas everyone!! 🎅🎅🎅🎄🎄🎄🌟🌟🌟☃️☃️☃️

We need a "hug" emoji.
 

jaders

Exalted member
Joined
Feb 1, 2012
Posts
2,669
@cinderella I know what you mean when you talk about your doctor saying he can't do this or that because he could lose his license. There have been so many times I have heard that from my doctor and I know he's lying, or sometimes exaggerating but of course I can't tell him he's lying because then he will hate me and cut me off entirely. It's such a baby's game and it's so tiring that I hate it and want to punch him in the face. These guys must think we are complete idiots to lie to our faces like they do. Anyway I'm glad your son helps you with your travel to your appointments and the staff at the pain clinic is so understanding. That's pretty huge.

It's Christmas!! Happy Christmas everyone!! 🎅🎅🎅🎄🎄🎄🌟🌟🌟☃️☃️☃️
Eh - I say just go ahead and punch him/her. It might be worth it... :LOL: I do have to say, I fractured my wrist the end of October and my PCP gave me so many oxy I literally was CERTAIN it was a typo mistake and called the office back to ask! I was expecting only a few til I saw the orthopedist but turned out my PCP gave me a month's supply!! Without that, I would've been really hurting tho, because the surgery was so dang painful for a few days and the ortho only gave norco. It certainly restored my faith in my own PCP, altho it still was only for short term, not like long term pain management. It's so crazy how inconsistent doctors are, even from patient to patient...:unsure:

Yah, get this xmas OVER!! I'm ready for sunshine and warm weather already...:cool:
 

Shock

Senior member
Joined
Feb 19, 2012
Posts
136
Yep so true! Stick around and other options though I’d prefer personally not to have to use them will open. QOL and well being remains most important to me. Good. Luck!
 

marymary

Senior member
Joined
Aug 2, 2015
Posts
68
I fractured my ankle in two places 3 1/2 years ago. The x-rays and CT scan show that it has healed but I am still in pain. My doctor, the ortho, sent me to a pain medication doctor because he said with his license he is unable to give me anything stronger than Tramadol. Because of Colvin I hadn't even had to go in person to the pain doctor what everything was done as a telemed visit. I have to go there in person on Tuesday though and haven't been since April. They have just been refilling my hydrocodone. I'm wondering because it is almost a year that I have been seeing them if they are going to try to get me off medication. Still don't know what we are doing about my ankle but I have to go to get an MRI because when I saw the surgeon he said but even though there is nothing wrong with the bone it might be ligaments tendons or possibly even nerve. I had been getting progressively worse and now I can't even use my Walker to go to the doctor but my son takes me in the wheelchair. I just hope I can still see this Pain Care Specialists because he and his staff are just so understanding.
Pretty sure your doctor straight up lied to you. If he is an MD or a DO he has the ability to write prescriptions for an class of drugs. He referred you to a pain clinic because he's a weasel, IMO.
 

Seychelle

Eminent member
Joined
Feb 24, 2020
Posts
1,533
Called out my replacement GP two days ago. Original GP for 20 years understood pain; would RX T4's, even Temazepam.
No consideration for pain with new Doc. Considers Baclofen & Flexeril recreational. Had a field day challenging his perceptions.
Told me I was rude and should basically piss off.

So I did
44 minutes to go...
Happy New Years to a wonderful membership:)
 
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jaders

Exalted member
Joined
Feb 1, 2012
Posts
2,669
Called out my replacement GP two days ago. Original GP for 20 years understood pain; would RX T4's, even Temazepam.
No consideration for pain with new Doc. Considers Baclofen & Flexeril recreational. Had a field day challenging his perceptions.
Told me I was rude and should basically piss off.

So I did
44 minutes to go...
Happy New Years to a wonderful membership:)

Gawd I just HATE the power these individuals have over our lives. You have an agreed upon “contract” with one doctor and a new one just arrogantly comes in to blow it all apart. They can rot in hell...🤬
 

auburnfan123

Honorable member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Posts
342
@jaders i totally agree.
I was in a recovery program for opioids because I had such a hard time tapering off of Oxycontin i was prescribed. I was on methadone.
During this period, I had horrible indigestion and acid reflux which caused me to wake up a few mornings having trouble breathing and my lungs feeling like they were on fire. After a few days of this I started having horrible chest and side pains on the right side. It got so bad that I could not lay down or walk, so i called an ambulance. When I got to the ER, they did xrays and CTscan which showed that the inhaled stomach contents had caused severe pneumonia and whats called a "plural effusion" which is basically when infection and fluid fill the space between your lungs and your chest wall. This was the most painful thing i have ever experienced and i have been thru alot. They put me on a bombardment of antibiotics and had to cut my chest open, fill the plural space with an acidic solution to break down the disgusting gunk in my chest, then sew a tube into my chest hooked up to a vacuum machine to suck out the material. I ended up being there in the hospital for over 5 weeks of hell. There were a few times that the infection kept increasing and i thought i would die.
Anyway, The doctors and nurses treated me absolutely horrible after I told them I take methadone. They had to continue giving it to me because withdrawal would have complicated things much worse. The doctors started giving me morphine and dilaudid in low doses to control the pain. Methadone occupies the same receptor that other painkillers go through, so a methadone patient feels nearly no effect from them and require much higher doses of much stronger painkillers to achieve pain relief. This is something i kept telling them and even pulled up the medical research proving. Yet every time I tried to tell them that i needed either higher doses, or a non-opioid alternative, they immediately assumed that I just wanted to get high. The only time I got any real pain relief was from a specific anti-inflammatory drug i was given a few times, and when they gave me fentanyl during the procedure of putting the tube in my chest. The rest of the time they just let me suffer. I was treated terrible. even when i was about to be discharge, the doctor sent me to have a "picc-line" ran from my arm into my heart so that i can inject the heparin and antibiotics for the next three weeks at home, but the doctor and the nurse tried to tell me that i had to stay another 3 weeks because "its state law that opiate addicts aren't allowed a pick-line because we will use it to inject drugs into". i tried to tell them that i never used needles in my life and was addicted to pills when i used, but they didnt believe me. so i called my methadone doctor from the clinic and told him about this and he got mad as HELL and called the hospital and called them out on that bullshit. they released me that day with my picc-line and my antibiotics. that hospital treated me terrible. And believe it or not, when i called the hospital to get the paperwork signed by the hospital so i could get my unemployment for being out of work, my doctor from the hospital refused to sign it. My doctor at the methadone clinic told me that these doctors dont like signing any state forms of methadone patients because they think it is likely to be fraudulent. fucking bullshit!
My methadone doctor ended up signing the paperwork so i got my unemployment eventually.
The way doctors today immediatly assume patients have an alterior motive of getting high anytime certain meds are needed is a disgrace. they always stress the importance of letting any new doctor know if u have ever been in treatment for addiction, but me personally, I think it is a horrible idea because of the stigma and discrimination u will get. why would anyone want to be honest to them about it if they are treated like this?? I will no longer tell doctors about it, unless i am hospitalized or put under anestesia. In those cases, they need to know because certain medications can counteract with suboxone/methadone and can precipitate instant withdrawl (which is dangerous). otherwise, its just not worth it.
 
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jaders

Exalted member
Joined
Feb 1, 2012
Posts
2,669
@jaders i totally agree.
I was in a recovery program for opioids because I had such a hard time tapering off of Oxycontin i was prescribed. I was on methadone.
During this period, I had horrible indigestion and acid reflux which caused me to wake up a few mornings having trouble breathing and my lungs feeling like they were on fire. After a few days of this I started having horrible chest and side pains on the right side. It got so bad that I could not lay down or walk, so i called an ambulance. When I got to the ER, they did xrays and CTscan which showed that the inhaled stomach contents had caused severe pneumonia and whats called a "plural effusion" which is basically when infection and fluid fill the space between your lungs and your chest wall. This was the most painful thing i have ever experienced and i have been thru alot. They put me on a bombardment of antibiotics and had to cut my chest open, fill the plural space with an acidic solution to break down the disgusting gunk in my chest, then sew a tube into my chest hooked up to a vacuum machine to suck out the material. I ended up being there in the hospital for over 5 weeks of hell. There were a few times that the infection kept increasing and i thought i would die.
Anyway, The doctors and nurses treated me absolutely horrible after I told them I take methadone. They had to continue giving it to me because withdrawal would have complicated things much worse. The doctors started giving me morphine and dilaudid in low doses to control the pain. Methadone occupies the same receptor that other painkillers go through, so a methadone patient feels nearly no effect from them and require much higher doses of much stronger painkillers to achieve pain relief. This is something i kept telling them and even pulled up the medical research proving. Yet every time I tried to tell them that i needed either higher doses, or a non-opioid alternative, they immediately assumed that I just wanted to get high. The only time I got any real pain relief was from a specific anti-inflammatory drug i was given a few times, and when they gave me fentanyl during the procedure of putting the tube in my chest. The rest of the time they just let me suffer. I was treated terrible. even when i was about to be discharge, the doctor sent me to have a "picc-line" ran from my arm into my heart so that i can inject the heparin and antibiotics for the next three weeks at home, but the doctor and the nurse tried to tell me that i had to stay another 3 weeks because "its state law that opiate addicts aren't allowed a pick-line because we will use it to inject drugs into". i tried to tell them that i never used needles in my life and was addicted to pills when i used, but they didnt believe me. so i called my methadone doctor from the clinic and told him about this and he got mad as HELL and called the hospital and called them out on that bullshit. they released me that day with my picc-line and my antibiotics. that hospital treated me terrible. And believe it or not, when i called the hospital to get the paperwork signed by the hospital so i could get my unemployment for being out of work, my doctor from the hospital refused to sign it. My doctor at the methadone clinic told me that these doctors dont like signing any state forms of methadone patients because they think it is likely to be fraudulent. fucking bullshit!
My methadone doctor ended up signing the paperwork so i got my unemployment eventually.
The way doctors today immediatly assume patients have an alterior motive of getting high anytime certain meds are needed is a disgrace. they always stress the importance of letting any new doctor know if u have ever been in treatment for addiction, but me personally, I think it is a horrible idea because of the stigma and discrimination u will get. why would anyone want to be honest to them about it if they are treated like this?? I will no longer tell doctors about it, unless i am hospitalized or put under anestesia. In those cases, they need to know because certain medications can counteract with suboxone/methadone and can precipitate instant withdrawl (which is dangerous). otherwise, its just not worth it.

Wow. What an ordeal!!! You should’ve written the “higher ups” at that hospital and detailed your treatment. Maybe someone would’ve listened. I’m impressed that your methadone doctor stepped up!

I SO agree with you that as long as the medical community treats addicts as less than human, they will have zero chance at people being honest or coming forward asking for help unless they’re near death. This judgement about “getting high” as tho anyone would put themselves thru all of that just to get high, is so absurd. There is a video circulating on Facebook where a black woman PHYSICIAN with Covid19 (who later died) was having trouble getting pain relief because they viewed her as an addict because of her skin color. It’s really unconscionable...

I 100 percent agree with you that being honest about any addiction history with ANY physician is a Superbad, terrible idea. In their fear of somehow “letting” you “get high” - they’d rather see you suffer - I just have no words. 😱. The one good thing about this opiate hysteria is it might FINALLY result in doctors actually becoming more educated about pain and the various drugs. How could any doctor not understand that if you’re on methadone of COURSE it would hamper your ability to get pain relief in that situation.

I sure long for the day when some sanity around this issue returns. 🙏☹️
 

nobknee

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Posts
286

Wow. What an ordeal!!! You should’ve written the “higher ups” at that hospital and detailed your treatment.

I completely know you didn't mean it this way, but this always strikes me as an indirect form of blaming the patient.

I've tried "writing the higher ups." In theory, it should have worked. I'm white, middle-class, well educated. I'm accustomed to being listened to and having my concerns taken seriously.

But when the concern is, "ER doctor lost control and started screaming at me because I couldn't remember the last painkiller I received in the ER and a friend had to stand between us because the doctor kept balling up his fists and I was afraid the doctor was going to hit one of us, but instead he accused me of being a liar and a drug addict"---they don't care about those concerns.

You can write to the higher-ups till the cows come home, and it might create change sometimes, but I wouldn't bet on it. Systems protect themselves and their own. You're at least as likely to get a reputation as a "problem patient" and make future interactions with the system worse for yourself.

Then factor in a patient who doesn't have some of the privileges of race and class that I have. How do you think the system is going to react to someone who doesn't look and sound like them, someone whom they react to as "the other"?

Pretty much all of us have stories that should have been taken seriously by clinic administration. Far fewer of us have stories that WERE taken seriously by clinic administration.

And since we've all had enough of not being taken seriously, I just don't recommend anyone do this unless they feel quite confident they will be treated with dignity and respect, and at the very least not punished for it.

Remember, everything goes in your permanent record, and it doesn't necessarily get recorded accurately. Reporting a problem to clinic administration should be viewed as a GIFT to them of your time and energy. If they're not going to receive it as a gift, well....then...

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">via GIPHY</a></p>
 

jaders

Exalted member
Joined
Feb 1, 2012
Posts
2,669

Wow. What an ordeal!!! You should’ve written the “higher ups” at that hospital and detailed your treatment.

I completely know you didn't mean it this way, but this always strikes me as an indirect form of blaming the patient.

I've tried "writing the higher ups." In theory, it should have worked. I'm white, middle-class, well educated. I'm accustomed to being listened to and having my concerns taken seriously.

But when the concern is, "ER doctor lost control and started screaming at me because I couldn't remember the last painkiller I received in the ER and a friend had to stand between us because the doctor kept balling up his fists and I was afraid the doctor was going to hit one of us, but instead he accused me of being a liar and a drug addict"---they don't care about those concerns.

You can write to the higher-ups till the cows come home, and it might create change sometimes, but I wouldn't bet on it. Systems protect themselves and their own. You're at least as likely to get a reputation as a "problem patient" and make future interactions with the system worse for yourself.

Then factor in a patient who doesn't have some of the privileges of race and class that I have. How do you think the system is going to react to someone who doesn't look and sound like them, someone whom they react to as "the other"?

Pretty much all of us have stories that should have been taken seriously by clinic administration. Far fewer of us have stories that WERE taken seriously by clinic administration.

And since we've all had enough of not being taken seriously, I just don't recommend anyone do this unless they feel quite confident they will be treated with dignity and respect, and at the very least not punished for it.

Remember, everything goes in your permanent record, and it doesn't necessarily get recorded accurately. Reporting a problem to clinic administration should be viewed as a GIFT to them of your time and energy. If they're not going to receive it as a gift, well....then...

<iframe src="https://giphy.com/embed/26FLhDoSzv4ig5qLu" width="480" height="270" frameBorder="0" class="giphy-embed" allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href="
">via GIPHY</a></p>

I understand where you’re coming from, and I should say - I wish we would (not should) write these up. I still believe in our ability to have our voices heard I guess. Especially if we do it en mass. At my healthcare provider company, they send out a survey for every dang single visit or phone call even, and I always detail the good and the bad. It does sound like your experience of your healthcare is definitely much worse than mine tho.

Without us finding some ways to fight back, it just feels like we are acquiescing I guess...🤔
 

nobknee

Honorable member
Joined
Nov 19, 2019
Posts
286

Wow. What an ordeal!!! You should’ve written the “higher ups” at that hospital and detailed your treatment.

I completely know you didn't mean it this way, but this always strikes me as an indirect form of blaming the patient.

I've tried "writing the higher ups." In theory, it should have worked. I'm white, middle-class, well educated. I'm accustomed to being listened to and having my concerns taken seriously.

But when the concern is, "ER doctor lost control and started screaming at me because I couldn't remember the last painkiller I received in the ER and a friend had to stand between us because the doctor kept balling up his fists and I was afraid the doctor was going to hit one of us, but instead he accused me of being a liar and a drug addict"---they don't care about those concerns.

You can write to the higher-ups till the cows come home, and it might create change sometimes, but I wouldn't bet on it. Systems protect themselves and their own. You're at least as likely to get a reputation as a "problem patient" and make future interactions with the system worse for yourself.

Then factor in a patient who doesn't have some of the privileges of race and class that I have. How do you think the system is going to react to someone who doesn't look and sound like them, someone whom they react to as "the other"?

Pretty much all of us have stories that should have been taken seriously by clinic administration. Far fewer of us have stories that WERE taken seriously by clinic administration.

And since we've all had enough of not being taken seriously, I just don't recommend anyone do this unless they feel quite confident they will be treated with dignity and respect, and at the very least not punished for it.

Remember, everything goes in your permanent record, and it doesn't necessarily get recorded accurately. Reporting a problem to clinic administration should be viewed as a GIFT to them of your time and energy. If they're not going to receive it as a gift, well....then...

<iframe src="https://giphy.com/embed/26FLhDoSzv4ig5qLu" width="480" height="270" frameBorder="0" class="giphy-embed" allowFullScreen></iframe><p><a href="
">via GIPHY</a></p>

I understand where you’re coming from, and I should say - I wish we would (not should) write these up. I still believe in our ability to have our voices heard I guess. Especially if we do it en mass. At my healthcare provider company, they send out a survey for every dang single visit or phone call even, and I always detail the good and the bad. It does sound like your experience of your healthcare is definitely much worse than mine tho.

Without us finding some ways to fight back, it just feels like we are acquiescing I guess...🤔

One of my heroes, an organizer and vocal advocate for pain patients, always says: "Do [x] if you feel you can do it safely." That may mean outing yourself publicly as a pain patient, or asking if it's emotionally safe to put yourself out there and possibly deal with people's ignorance, etc. And the feeling of safety may change from day to day.

It's like working with rape victims: Report it if you feel safe doing so. Rather than putting it on the victim that she "should" report in order to prevent future assaults, or to punish the perpetrator, or too often just to be believed.

I've had my share of good and bad experiences in the healthcare system. I probably don't write so much about the good ones, because most of them really ought to be the norm. I once burst into tears and thanked a pharmacist profusely for NOT treating me like a drug addict. She was very kind. I even wrote a letter to company HQ praising her. But, really, it shouldn't be deserving of cookies and a promotion to NOT treat somebody like shit.

I've also seen the way the healthcare system treats one of my friends who is American Indian. I am treated like a queen by comparison. They refused to believe she wasn't an alcoholic and attempted to overdose her on Tylenol. That's WAY worse than anything that's ever happened to me! I've dealt with doctors with bad tempers and, more often, just a system that checks boxes rather than cares for individuals. Watching racism like that was disturbing, because it's not my everyday experience.

But for somebody who does feel safe doing it, I would certainly support them reporting it!
 

auburnfan123

Honorable member
Joined
May 15, 2011
Posts
342
I 100 percent agree with you that being honest about any addiction history with ANY physician is a Superbad, terrible idea. In their fear of somehow “letting” you “get high” - they’d rather see you suffer - I just have no words.
You have got that right brother.
Having a prior addiction to prescribed meds is a terrible situation to be in. Doctors just consider covering their ass from the DEAs harrassment to be more of a priority than helping the patient. And the whole situation is self-reinforcing because when someone like me decides not to inform the doctors of thier prior addiction because of fear of being labeled a "drug seeker" and being discriminated against, and later the doctor finds out about it and that you failed to inform him/her of this, it just reinforces their untrue assumption about u. They believe that you failed to tell them because you really were just drug seeking. catch22
This is why i oppose a federal medical database (even though it would help to cut waste from the medical system).
it would be nice to not have to fill out so much paperwork about your medical history and the medications you take/were taking when u see a new doctor or are sent to the emergency room and u r unconscious. It would be much easier if there were a database that they could just pull up that stores all that info, but unfortunatly it would be used as just another tool to discriminate us with. Not to mention, there are HIPPA laws that are supposed to guarantee the right to privacy when it comes to your medical history.
Even if they made a volunteer-only database like that, im sure the doctors & DEA would just move the goalpost and discriminte based on who volunteers and who doesnt. They would just assume that anyone who chooses not to be put in said database, to be hiding something due to their "drug seeking". There just seems to be no way to win.
 
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