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The silencing of pain patients.

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Anne Onomis

Distinguished member
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
Posts
682
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20091598

This link from the one article is worth posting separately - the addiction rate for chronic noncancer pain really IS less than 1%!

Almost every source on both sides seems to agree about one in ten people are predisposed to opioid addiction. So about one in ten of that number becoming so from a prescription exposure makes sense. It is for that reason that I am ok with caution and short scripts for first- time users with more mild stuff. Especially younger folks. Going after the most disabled, vulnerable people with well-documented conditions is just cruel - but that is who they are focusing on, the small number of severe cases that out of necessity account for a big percentage of the usage.
 

Bawston

Eminent member
Joined
Jan 23, 2015
Posts
1,313
@Anne Onomis... I'm not sure if I've got enough data to make this a definite fact, but it seems to me that a good number of these 'doctors' who are anti-pain meds have affiliations, either currently or former with detox centers, rehabs, etc.... John Oliver did a show a while back on how these rehabs don't have much oversight and are raking in money from government programs. Many are just sham operations - I recall one addict who was interviewed who said the therapy was to pet horses. He said "how's that going to help me? I don't even LIKE F'ing horses!"

Sadly, he later died after being released.

This is the big story in my opinion - phoned rehabs charging huge bucks and an endless pile of money going into drug testing companies. Almost every job requires a urine sample now, plus in my state it's the law that you have to have at least one sample per year.

I'd just like to know what people have against treating pain.
 

Bawston

Eminent member
Joined
Jan 23, 2015
Posts
1,313
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20091598

This link from the one article is worth posting separately - the addiction rate for chronic noncancer pain really IS less than 1%!

Almost every source on both sides seems to agree about one in ten people are predisposed to opioid addiction. So about one in ten of that number becoming so from a prescription exposure makes sense. It is for that reason that I am ok with caution and short scripts for first- time users with more mild stuff. Especially younger folks. Going after the most disabled, vulnerable people with well-documented conditions is just cruel - but that is who they are focusing on, the small number of severe cases that out of necessity account for a big percentage of the usage.

Interesting that you bring that up because I was just trying to find an interview that Dr Phil did where he flat out stated that addiction rate was something like 70% !!!!! Where the hell did he pull that number from? Yet how many will believe him because...Dr Phil...
 

Anne Onomis

Distinguished member
Joined
Jan 16, 2013
Posts
682
@Anne Onomis... I'm not sure if I've got enough data to make this a definite fact, but it seems to me that a good number of these 'doctors' who are anti-pain meds have affiliations, either currently or former with detox centers, rehabs, etc.... John Oliver did a show a while back on how these rehabs don't have much oversight and are raking in money from government programs. Many are just sham operations - I recall one addict who was interviewed who said the therapy was to pet horses. He said "how's that going to help me? I don't even LIKE F'ing horses!"

Sadly, he later died after being released.

This is the big story in my opinion - phoned rehabs charging huge bucks and an endless pile of money going into drug testing companies. Almost every job requires a urine sample now, plus in my state it's the law that you have to have at least one sample per year.

I'd just like to know what people have against treating pain.

Ohh yeah, read a lot on how rehab is for the most part statistically useless (aside from more personalized ones utilizing MAT, but even then the person has to want it), for the most part it is just a revolving door racket. Often does more harm than good since they detox which sets them up for a fatal OD when they almost invariably relapse. Harm reduction is the best we can really do with those who are not yet ready to stop... have the necessary supports (which is not the 30 insurance covered days in a facility around people who have the same issues and may feed off each other) in place, plus easily accessible MAT, for when they are.
 

Maggiemaie

Senior member
Joined
Aug 18, 2011
Posts
168
@Kevinac :I am so sorry this happened to you. I also have had a bilateral hip replacement and I simply CAN'T begin to imagine how you felt. This is malpractice, pure and simple. I firmly believe being pain free is the biggest factor in the length of recovery time, especially in an operation this big. I did very well post op. I can't go into specifics, I do not want to ring any bells, you never know who is reading. But regardless, I would never been able to accomplish so much so quickly if I had been in pain. Allowing someone to suffer post op is like torture. I have read the government ordered Perdue to decrease production of some opioids since the "crisis". I wonder if some of the stinginess is coming from a lack of supply. Hurricane Maria left us with a severe shortage of parenteral solutions (ie IV fluids). According to the FDA, pharmaceutical products manufactured in Puerto Rico make up 10% of all drugs used by Americans. Only 1-2 producers make the vast majority of injectables. Drug shortages in the US is a major issue and one that has not been freely addressed by the press (at least to my knowledge). I can only hope and pray that will change.
 
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Qtrgirl

Lapsed Senior Member
Joined
Mar 22, 2012
Posts
105
The medical profession saw a big change when the AMA came out with guidelines that say that opioids were really only effective in treating pain on an acute basis last year. The recommendation was that patients should only be on it for a week for acute conditions. That’s when we started seeing doctors weaning patients off or lowering doses. It’s only gotten worse since then. Now insurance companies are refusing to fill legit scripts for pain medication if it’s more than a weeks worth. Everyone follows the advice of the ama.
 

jaders

Exalted member
Joined
Feb 1, 2012
Posts
3,205
https://www.yahoo.com/news/opioid-crackdown-leaves-chronic-pain-143104390.html

I know it is old thread, but another interesting article with good info... combined with some states throwing out lawsuits, maybe tide will start turning back our way?

Great article!

Have you seen these other two threads here on PR?



Two positives for sure!! 😃
 
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