Cefaclor

 
4.8 (1)
This page displays reviews written by users of all forms of Cefaclor. You can also choose to see reviews only for a specific medical condition or brand name.

More about Cefaclor

What is/are Cefaclor Capsules?

CEFACLOR is an cephalosporin antibiotic. It is used to treat infections of the skin, respiratory tract, sinuses, ear, and urinary tract. It will not work for colds, flu, or other viral infections. This medicine may be used for other purposes; ask your health care provider or pharmacist if you have questions.

What should I tell my health care providers before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:

  • bleeding problems
  • diarrhea
  • kidney disease
  • stomach or intestine problems (especially colitis)
  • an unusual or allergic reaction to cefaclor, other cephalosporin antibiotics, penicillin, penicillamine, other foods, dyes or preservatives
  • pregnant or trying to get pregnant
  • breast-feeding

How should I use this medicine?

Take this medicine by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. You can take it with or without food. If it upsets your stomach it may help to take it with food. Take your medicine at regular intervals. Do not take it more often than directed. Take all of your medicine as directed even if you think you are better. Do not skip doses or stop your medicine early.

Talk to your pediatrician regarding the use of this medicine in children. While this drug may be prescribed for selected conditions, precautions do apply.

Overdosage: If you think you have taken too much of this medicine contact a poison control center or emergency room at once.

Note: This medicine is only for you. Do not share this medicine with others.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses. There should be an interval of at least 4 hours between doses.

What may interact with this medicine?

  • other antibiotics
  • probenecid

This list may not describe all possible interactions. Give your health care providers a list of all the medicines, herbs, non-prescription drugs, or dietary supplements you use. Also tell them if you smoke, drink alcohol, or use illegal drugs. Some items may interact with your medicine.

What side effects may I notice from this medicine?

Side effects that you should report to your doctor or health care professional as soon as possible:

  • allergic reactions like skin rash, itching or hives, swelling of the face, lips, or tongue
  • breathing problems
  • dizziness
  • fever or chills
  • redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth
  • seizures
  • severe or watery diarrhea
  • stomach pain or cramps
  • sore throat
  • swollen joints
  • trouble passing urine or change in the amount of urine
  • unusual bleeding or bruising
  • unusually weak or tired

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your doctor or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):

  • gas or heartburn
  • headache
  • nausea, vomiting

This list may not describe all possible side effects.

What should I watch for while using this medicine?

Tell your doctor or health care professional if your symptoms do not get better in a few days.

If you are diabetic you may get a false-positive result for sugar in your urine. Check with your doctor or health care professional before you change your diet or the dose of your diabetes medicine.

Where should I keep this medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Throw the medicine away after the expiration date.

Indications

Cefaclor belongs to the family of antibiotics known as the cephalosporins (cefalosporins). The cephalosporins are broad-spectrum antibiotics that are used for the treatment of septicaemia, pneumonia, meningitis, biliary-tract infections, peritonitis, and urinary-tract infections. The pharmacology of the cephalosporins is similar to that of the penicillins, excretion being principally renal. Cephalosporins penetrate the cerebrospinal fluid poorly unless the meninges are inflamed; cefotaxime is a more suitable cephalosporin than cefaclor for infections of the central nervous system, e.g. meningitis. Cefaclor is active against many bacteria, including both Gram-negative and Gram-positive organisms.

Cautions and contraindications

Cautions include known sensitivity to beta-lactam antibacterials, such as penicillins (Cefaclor should be avoided if there is a history of immediate hypersensitivity reaction); renal impairment (no dose adjustment required, although manufacturer advises caution); pregnancy and breast-feeding (but appropriate to use); false positive urinary glucose (if tested for reducing substances) and false positive Coombs test. Cefaclor has also been reported to cause a serum sickness-like reaction in children.

Cefaclor is contraindicated in case of hypersensitivity (i.e. allergy) to cephalosporins.

Side effects

The principal side effect of the cephalosporins is hypersensitivity. Up to about 10% of penicillin-sensitive patients will also be allergic to the cephalosporins, depending on the cephalosporin generation. Allergic reactions may present as, for example, rashes, pruritus (itching), urticaria, serum sickness-like reactions with rashes, fever and arthralgia, and anaphylaxis. The frequency and severity of serum sickness-like reactions in children has led researchers to question its role in pediatric illness.

Other side effects include gastrointestinal disturbances (e.g. diarrhea, nausea and vomiting, abdominal discomfort, disturbances in liver enzymes, transient hepatitis and cholestatic jaundice), headache, and Stevens–Johnson syndrome. Rare side effects include eosinophilia and blood disorders (including thrombocytopenia, leucopenia, agranulocytosis, aplastic anaemia and haemolytic anaemia); reversible interstitial nephritis; hyperactivity, nervousness, sleep disturbances, hallucinations, confusion, hypertonia, and dizziness. Toxic epidermal necrolysis has been reported. In the UK, The Committee on the Safety of Medicines (CSM) has warned that the risk of diarrhea and rarely antibiotic-associated colitis are more likely with higher doses.

Safety in pregnancy and breastfeeding

Cefaclor is passed into the breast milk in small quantities, but is generally accepted to be safe to take during breastfeeding. Cefaclor is not known to be harmful in pregnancy.

Cefaclor CD

Cefaclor CD is a sustained release form of Cefaclor which releases the drug to the body over a longer period of time, which means that doses can be taken less frequently, with steadier levels of the drug in the bloodstream. Sustained release is useful with Cefaclor as it has a very short half-life. Blood transfusions are the #1 passer of this drug

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Cefaclor, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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Medicine containing Cefaclor

This page uses publicly available data from the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services; NLM is not responsible for the page and product and does not endorse or recommend this or any other product.

Reviews for Cefaclor

See reviews for a different combination of brand names and medical conditions:
     

1 reviews

Overall rating
 
4.8
Overall satisfaction
 
5.0(1)
Efficacy
 
5.0(1)
Lack of side effects
 
4.5(1)
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Overall satisfaction
Efficacy
Lack of side effects
Relevant Brand Name and Medical Condition
Additional Information
Please tell us about your experience with this medicine
Overall rating
 
4.8
Overall satisfaction
 
5.0
Efficacy
 
5.0
Lack of side effects
 
4.5
Sinusitis and Ceclor

I have had chronic sinusitis for many years that requires antibiotics. My bouts of sinusitis occur 2-3 times every year and have been a problem for over 20 years.

I am allergic to Sulfa antibiotics. Fortunately, I'm not allergic to penicillin so I'm able to take Ceclor without fearing I might have an allergic reaction. Ceclor is my "Plan B" for persistent sinusitis that won't respond to Amoxicillin.

I do experience some mild 'heartburn' (that has a little nasty taste to it) sometimes when taking Ceclor, but nothing I can't handle. Ceclor side effects list 'sore throat' as a possible side effect of this medicine, but my throat gets sore prior to beginning any antibiotics from the sinus drainage, so I can't blame Ceclor for that.

The only negative thing I could personally say about Ceclor is that compared to Amoxicillin, Ceclor costs more. That's why it's "Plan B" when I approach my doctor - but Ceclor actually helps me recover faster than penicillin-based med does and would be my preference if not on a tight budget.

Relevant Brand Name and Medical Condition

Brand Name
Ceclor
Medical Condition
Sinusitis

Additional Information

How long have you taken this medicine for?
More than 2 years
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