Cefadroxil

 
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More about Cefadroxil

What are cefadroxil tablets or capsules?

CEFADROXIL (Duricef®) is a cephalosporin antibiotic. It treats many kinds of infections including those of the skin, respiratory tract, sinuses, ears, and urinary tract. Generic cefadroxil tablets and capsules are available.

What should I tell my health care provider before I take this medicine?

They need to know if you have any of these conditions:
• bleeding problems
• kidney disease
• stomach or intestinal problems (especially colitis)
• other chronic illness
• an unusual or allergic reaction to cefadroxil, other cephalosporin antibiotics, penicillin, penicillamine, other foods, dyes or preservatives
• pregnant or trying to get pregnant
• breast-feeding

How should I take this medicine?

Take cefadroxil tablets or capsules by mouth. Follow the directions on the prescription label. Swallow the tablets or capsules with a drink of water. You can take cefadroxil with or without food. If cefadroxil upsets your stomach it may help to take it with food. Take your doses at regular intervals. Do not take your medicine more often than directed. Finish the full course prescribed by your prescriber or health care professional even if you think your condition is better. Do not stop taking except on your prescriber's advice.

Contact your pediatrician or health care professional regarding the use of this medicine in children. Special care may be needed.

What if I miss a dose?

If you miss a dose, take it as soon as you can. If it is almost time for your next dose, take only that dose. Do not take double or extra doses. There should be an interval of at least 4 to 6 hours between doses.

What drug(s) may interact with cefadroxil?

• other antibiotics
• probenecid

Tell your prescriber or health care professional about all other medicines you are taking, including non-prescription medicines, nutritional supplements, or herbal products. Also tell your prescriber or health care professional if you are a frequent user of drinks with caffeine or alcohol, if you smoke, or if you use illegal drugs. These may affect the way your medicine works. Check with your health care professional before stopping or starting any of your medicines.

What side effects may I notice from taking cefadroxil?

Side effects that you should report to your prescriber or health care professional as soon as possible:
• difficulty breathing, wheezing
• dizziness
• fever or chills, sore throat
• headache
• reduced amount of urine
• redness, blistering, peeling or loosening of the skin, including inside the mouth
• seizures (convulsions)
• severe or watery diarrhea
• skin rash, itching
• swollen joints
• unusual weakness or tiredness

Side effects that usually do not require medical attention (report to your prescriber or health care professional if they continue or are bothersome):
• diarrhea
• gas or heartburn
• nausea, vomiting

What should I watch for while taking cefadroxil?

Tell your prescriber or health care professional if your symptoms do not begin to improve in a few days.

If you are diabetic you may get a false-positive result for sugar in your urine. Check with your prescriber or health care professional before you change your diet or the dose of your diabetic medicine.

If you get severe or watery diarrhea, do not treat yourself. Call your prescriber or health care professional for advice.

Where can I keep my medicine?

Keep out of the reach of children in a container that small children cannot open.

Store at room temperature between 15 and 30 degrees C (59 and 86 degrees F). Throw away any unused medicine after the expiration date.

General use

Cefadroxil is a first-generation cephalosporin antibacterial drug that is the para-hydroxy derivative of cefalexin, and is used similarly in the treatment of mild to moderate susceptible infections such as the bacterium Streptococcus pyogenes, causing the disease popularly called strep throat or Streptococcal tonsillitis, urinary tract infection, reproductive tract infection and skin infections.

Pharmacokinetics

Cefadroxil is almost completely absorbed from the gastrointestinal tract. After doses of 500 mg and 1 g by mouth, peak plasma concentrations of about 16 and 30 micrograms/mL respectively are obtained after 1.5 to 2 hours. Although peak concentrations are similar to those of cefalexin, plasma concentrations are more sustained. Dosage with food does not appear to affect the absorption of cefadroxil. About 20% of cefadroxil is reported to be bound to plasma proteins. The plasma half-life of cefadroxil is about 1.5 hours and is prolonged in patients with renal impairment.

Cefadroxil is widely distributed to body tissues and fluids. It crosses the placenta and appears in breast milk.

More than 90% of a dose of cefadroxil may be excreted unchanged in the urine within 24 hours by glomerular filtration and tubular secretion; peak urinary concentrations of 1.8 mg/mL have been reported after a dose of 500 mg. Cefadroxil is removed by haemodialysis.

Dosage

Cefadroxil is given by mouth, and doses are expressed in terms of the anhydrous substance; 1.04 g of cefadroxil monohydrate is equivalent to about 1 g of anhydrous cefadroxil.
PO Adults. 500 mg–1g q12h; Peds. 15 mg/kg q12h; decrease in renal impair.

Side effects

The most common side effects of Cefadroxil are diarrhea (which, less commonly, may be bloody), nausea, upset stomach, and vomiting. Other side effects include:

  • Rashes
  • Hives
  • Itching

Dental use

Cefadroxil is used as an antibiotic prophylaxis before dental procedures, although amoxicillin and metronidazole are also used as first line of treatment. In case of penicillin allergy, Cefadroxil is used for prophylaxis.

Veterinary use

Can be used for treating infected wounds on animals. Usually in powder form mixed with water has a color and smell similar to Tang. Given orally to animals, amount dependent on their weight and severity of infection.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Cefadroxil, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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Medicine containing Cefadroxil

This page uses publicly available data from the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services; NLM is not responsible for the page and product and does not endorse or recommend this or any other product.

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