All Day Allergy (Cetirizine)

 
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All Day Allergy is one brand name of the medicine also known by its generic name Cetirizine. This page displays only reviews left by users of All Day Allergy. Click here to see all reviews left for all forms of Cetirizine. You can also choose other review combinations.

More about Cetirizine

What is/are Cetirizine?

Cetirizine /sɛˈtɪrɨziːn/ is a second-generation antihistamine used in the treatment of allergies, hay fever, angioedema, and urticaria. It is a major metabolite of hydroxyzine, and a racemic selective H1 receptor inverse agonist.

Availability

Formerly prescription-only in the USA and Canada, cetirizine is now available over-the-counter in both countries as Zyrtec and Reactine, respectively. Zyrtec was the highest-grossing new non-food product of 2008 in the US, generating sales of $315.9 million. It is also available as a generic drug. In Turkey, Australia and New Zealand, Zyrtec is available over-the-counter in pharmacies and in the UK cetirizine can be sold in limited quantities off-the-shelf in any outlet and is often available in supermarkets. As of 2009, Germany made many generic drugs containing cetirizine available in pharmacies without prescription. Norway, Sweden, Finland, Poland and Israel also recognize Cetirizine as an over-the-counter medicine. In India, it is sold over-the-counter as brand-name "CTZ" (formerly called "Cetzine"), even though it remains classified as a Schedule H (prescription) drug. India also classifies Cetirizine as an OTC drug. It is used as an alternative to Pheniramine (Avil) which is not given as OTC anymore in India.

Administration method and metabolism

Chewable, non-chewable, and syrup forms of cetirizine are similarly absorbed rapidly and effectively, with absorbed food minutely affecting the absorption rate which yields a peak serum level one hour after administration; in a study of healthy volunteers prescribed 10 mg tablets, once daily for 10 days, a mean peak serum level of 311 ng/mL was observed. The metabolic effects of cetirizine are long acting, remaining in the system for a maximum of 21 hours before being excreted; the average elimination half-life is 8 hours. About 70% of the drug is removed through urination, of which half is observed as unchanged cetirizine compound. Another 10% is excreted.

Like many other antihistamine medications, cetirizine is commonly prescribed in combination with pseudoephedrine hydrochloride, a decongestant. These combinations are marketed using the same brand name as the cetirizine with a "-D" suffix (Zyrtec-D, Virlix-D, etc.)

Side effects

Dryness of the mouth, nose and throat, drowsiness, urinary retention, blurred vision, nightmares and stomach ache are commonly reported side effects of this drug. Cetirizine does not block the action of the muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, even though these side effects can occur in some patients. Also, cetirizine does not have antidopaminergic properties. In 2012, the FDA added cetirizine in Drugs to Watch List for oculogyric crisis.

Drug Uses

Zyrtec is an antihistamine. Antihistamines prevent sneezing, runny nose, itching and watering of the eyes, and other allergic symptoms. Zyrtec is used to treat allergies, hives (urticaria), and other allergic inflammatory conditions.

How Taken

Zyrtec comes as a tablet to take it orally. It usually is taken once a day. It may be taken regularly or when allergy symptoms flare up. Follow the directions on your prescription label carefully, and ask your doctor or pharmacist to explain any part you do not understand. Take Zyrtec exactly as directed. Do not take more or less of it or take it more often than prescribed by your doctor.

Warnings/Precautions

Before taking this medication, tell your doctor if you have kidney or liver disease. You may need a lower dose or special monitoring during your therapy with Zyrtec. Zyrtec is in the FDA pregnancy category B. This means that it is unlikely to harm an unborn baby. Do not take Zyrtec without first talking to your doctor if you are pregnant. Zyrtec passes into breast milk and may affect a nursing baby. Do not take Zyrtec without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. If you are over 60 years of age, you may be more likely to experience side effects from Zyrtec. You may require a lower dose of this medication.

Missed Dose

If you forget to take a dose, do not take an extra tablet to catch up for the dose you forgot. Wait and take your next tablet at the regular time. Do not take more tablets than your doctor prescribed.

Possible Side Effects

Stop taking Zyrtec and seek emergency medical attention if you experience an allergic reaction (difficulty breathing; closing of your throat; swelling of your lips, tongue, or face; or hives). Other, less serious side effects may be more likely to occur. Continue to take Zyrtec and talk to your doctor if you experience sleepiness, fatigue, or dizziness; headache; or dry mouth. Side effects other than those listed here may also occur. Talk to your doctor about any side effect that seems unusual or that is especially bothersome.

Storage

Store at 20-25°C (68-77°F); excursions permitted to 15-30°C (59-86°F).

Overdose

Seek emergency medical attention. Symptoms of a Zyrtec overdose are not well known, but extreme sleepiness, confusion, and weakness may be expected.

More Information

Use caution when driving, operating machinery, or performing other hazardous activities. Zyrtec may cause dizziness or drowsiness. If you experience dizziness or drowsiness, avoid these activities. Use alcohol cautiously. Alcohol may increase drowsiness and dizziness while you are taking Zyrtec.

Disclaimer

This drug information is for your information purposes only, it is not intended that this information covers all uses, directions, drug interactions, precautions, or adverse effects of your medication. This is only general information, and should not be relied on for any purpose. It should not be construed as containing specific instructions for any particular patient. We disclaim all responsibility for the accuracy and reliability of this information, and/or any consequences arising from the use of this information, including damage or adverse consequences to persons or property, however such damages or consequences arise. No warranty, either expressed or implied, is made in regards to this information.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Cetirizine, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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Medicine containing Cetirizine

This page uses publicly available data from the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services; NLM is not responsible for the page and product and does not endorse or recommend this or any other product.

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