Mylanta (Famotidine)

 
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Mylanta is one brand name of the medicine also known by its generic name Famotidine. This page displays only reviews left by users of Mylanta. Click here to see all reviews left for all forms of Famotidine. You can also choose other review combinations.

More about Famotidine

What is/are Abatacept?

Famotidine (INN) /fəˈmɒtɪdiːn/ is a histamine H2-receptor antagonist that inhibits stomach acid production, and it is commonly used in the treatment of peptic ulcer disease (PUD) and gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD/GORD). It is commonly marketed by Johnson & Johnson/Merck under the trade names Pepcidine and Pepcid and by Astellas under the trade name Gaster. Unlike cimetidine, the first H2 antagonist, famotidine has no effect on the cytochrome P450 enzyme system, and does not appear to interact with other drugs.

Generic Pepcid (FAMOTIDINE) is a histamine blocker used to treat and prevent ulcers. It is also used to treat Gastroesophageal Reflux Disease (GERD). This medicine may also be used to treat other conditions as determined by your doctor.

Medical uses

Certain preparations of famotidine are available over the counter (OTC) in various countries. In the United States, preparations of 10 mg and 20 mg tablets, sometimes in combination with a more traditional antacid, are available OTC. Larger doses still require a prescription.

Famotidine is given to surgery patients before operations to prevent postoperative nausea and to reduce the risk of aspiration pneumonitis. Famotidine is also given to some patients who take NSAIDs, to prevent peptic ulcers. It serves as an alternative to proton-pump inhibitors.

It is also given to dogs with acid reflux.

Famotidine has also been used in combination with an H1 antagonist to treat and prevent urticaria caused by an acute allergic reaction.

Adverse effects

Famotidine was developed by Yamanouchi Pharmaceutical Co. It was licensed in the mid-80s by Merck & Co. and is marketed by a joint venture between Merck and Johnson & Johnson. The imidazole-ring of cimetidine was replaced with a 2-guanidinothiazole ring. Famotidine proved to be 30 times more active than cimetidine.

It was first marketed in 1981. Pepcid RPD orally-disintegrating tablets (that are not swallowed) were released in 1999. Generic preparations became available in 2001, e.g. Fluxid (Schwarz) or Quamatel (Gedeon Richter Ltd.).

In the United States, a product called Pepcid Complete is available that combines famotidine with an antacid in a chewable tablet to ameliorate the relatively slow onset of effects. In the UK, this product is known as Pepcidtwo.

Famotidine suffers from poor bioavailability (50%), as it is poorly soluble in the low pH of the stomach. Famotidine used in combination with antacids promotes local delivery of these drugs to the receptor of the parietal cell wall. Therefore, researchers are developing innovative formulations of tablets, such as gastroretentive drug delivery systems. Such tablets are retained in the stomach for a longer period of time and thereby improve the bioavailability of drugs. Local delivery also increases bioavailability at the stomach wall receptor site and increases the efficacy of drugs to reduce acid secretion.

Side effects

Side effects are associated with famotidine use. In clinical trials, the most common adverse effects were headache, dizziness, and constipation or diarrhea. Antacid preparations such as famotidine, by suppressing acid-mediated breakdown of proteins, lead to an elevated risk of developing food or drug allergies. This happens due to undigested proteins then passing into the gastrointestinal tract where sensitization occurs. It is unclear whether this risk occurs with only long-term use or with short-term use as well.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Famotidine, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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Medicine containing Famotidine

This page uses publicly available data from the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services; NLM is not responsible for the page and product and does not endorse or recommend this or any other product.

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