Ibuprofen

Ibuprofen

 
4.3 (3)
This page displays reviews written by users of all forms of Ibuprofen. You can also choose to see reviews only for a specific medical condition or brand name.
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Reviews for Ibuprofen

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Average user rating from: 3 user(s)

Overall rating 
 
4.3
Overall satisfaction 
 
4.2  (3)
Efficacy  
 
4.3  (3)
Lack of side effects 
 
4.5  (3)

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Ratings (the higher the better)
  • Overall satisfaction
  • Efficacy
  • Lack of side effects
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How long have you taken this medicine for?
More than 2 years
Overall rating 
 
3.7
Overall satisfaction 
 
3.0
Efficacy  
 
3.0
Lack of side effects 
 
5.0
Reviewed by robynz March 12, 2014
Last updated: March 13, 2014
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (7)
robynz is a member of the Pharmacy Reviewer forum
Total Posts: 69
Reputation Score: 76
User Title: Senior Member

Ibuprofen

I have taken this medication for over 20 years. I have taken it for headaches, back pain, and muscle soreness. I find it most effective for headaches. It doesn't really help very much for my back pain or muscle soreness. Lately, I have found good ole aspirin to due to trick in a more effective manner. Also, I find the Advil Liquid to be more effective than the plain pills.

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Relevant Brand Name and Medical Condition

Brand Name
Advil
Medical Condition
Pain

Additional Information

How long have you taken this medicine for?
More than 2 years
Overall rating 
 
4.3
Overall satisfaction 
 
4.5
Efficacy  
 
5.0
Lack of side effects 
 
3.5
January 31, 2014
Reviewed anonymously by a forum member

Guard Your Stomach with Ibuprofen

When Advil became available OTC I frequently took it for headaches, sinus pain, muscle aches and many types of pain, like menstrual cramps. It was very effective at that time.

However, I guess my stomach wasn't meant for all that Advil because I developed problems with taking it or any medicine in that same class - Even tho I always ate food with it and tried to protect myself from any negative effects. I had terrible reflux, heartburn, and my stomach began to hurt for several days if I took even one regular dose. I totally stopped taking it for several years because of this.

Now I take the Enteric Coated form my doctor prescribes (also has something in it to soothe my stomach) and don't have the problems with reflux or days of stomach pain that I did when taking the regular OTC type Advil. I would recommend people take the enteric coated form of this med so they won't develop problems with their stomach, because it is a common problem with NSAIDS like Advil (ibuprofen).

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Relevant Brand Name and Medical Condition

Medical Condition
Pain

Additional Information

How long have you taken this medicine for?
More than 2 years
Overall rating 
 
5.0
Overall satisfaction 
 
5.0
Efficacy  
 
5.0
Lack of side effects 
 
5.0
Reviewed by darwin January 23, 2014
Top 10 Reviewer  -   View all my reviews (6)
darwin is a member of the Pharmacy Reviewer forum
Total Posts: 27
Reputation Score: 37
User Title: Member

Ibuprofen Is A Helpful Pain Reliever

I've taken Ibuprofen, both OTC 200 mg and prescribed 800 mg, for many years. My experiences with this drug have mostly been OTC, but in the last two years my doctors has prescribed the 800 mg dose.

I find Ibuprofen to be one of the most effective pain relievers I can buy OTC. Ibuprofen works well for me for arthritic pain (I've dealt with this condition for over 20 years) and find in most cases, Ibuprofen is great for mild to moderate pain. It's the best NSAID I take for this level of pain. It also works well when I have migraines (which isn't often, usually only once or twice a year), but the key in this case is catching the headache early. Ibuprofen does not work for my migraines if I take it once the headache has set in.

It is also fair to note that I have an unusually high pain tolerance. This is just how I roll. When I am in pain, it's pretty bad. I think that what I tolerate and brush off as a level 1-6 on the pain scale would probably send someone else straight to the ER or family physician for help.

That said and all things being fair, I have to give Ibuprofen two thumbs up and my full endorsement. Besides aspirin, nothing else helps my aches and pains so well that I can buy without a script.

I don't have side effects with OTC Ibuprofen as far as 200 mg doses. The 800 mg dose has made me dizzy sometimes, however. But that's the only side effect, and I get past that by not doing anything strenuous if I take that large of a dose. I think I may have some ankle swelling, too, but it's not too great. With my arthritis, I've taken NSAIDS for years...so I guess that's expected to have some adverse effects at this stage of the game.

The only downside I see to taking Ibuprofen, OTC or scripted, is that you have to take so many pills daily. That's not good for your liver and toxicity levels. My doctor's taken me off Ibuprofen because of that.

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More about Ibuprofen


What is/are Ibuprofen?

Ibuprofen (INN) (/ˈaɪbjuːproʊfɛn/ or /aɪbjuːˈproʊfən/ EYE-bew-PROH-fən; from iso-butyl-propanoic-phenolic acid) is a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID) used for pain relief, fever reduction, and against swelling.

Ibuprofen has an antiplatelet effect, though relatively mild and somewhat short-lived compared with aspirin or prescription antiplatelet drugs. In general, ibuprofen also has a vasodilation effect. Ibuprofen is a 'core' medicine in the World Health Organization's Model List of Essential Medicines necessary to meet the minimum medical needs of a basic healthcare system. Ibuprofen was derived from propanoic acid by the research arm of Boots Group during the 1960s and patented in 1961. Originally marketed as Brufen, ibuprofen is available under a variety of popular trademarks, including Motrin, Nurofen, Advil, and Nuprin. Generic formulations are available as well.

Generic Motrin (IBUPROFEN) is a pain reliever and fever reducer. Temporarily relieves minor aches and pains due to: headache, muscular aches, toothache, minor pain of arthritis, backache, the common cold, menstrual cramps. Temporarily reduces fever.

Medical uses

Ibuprofen is used primarily for fever, pain, dysmenorrhea and inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. It is also used for pericarditis and patent ductus arteriosus

Adverse effects

Common adverse effects include: nausea, dyspepsia, gastrointestinal ulceration/bleeding, raised liver enzymes, diarrhea, constipation, epistaxis, headache, dizziness, rash, salt and fluid retention, and hypertension. A study from 2010 has shown regular use of NSAIDs was associated with an increase in hearing loss.

Infrequent adverse effects include: esophageal ulceration, heart failure, hyperkalemia, renal impairment, confusion, and bronchospasm. Ibuprofen can exacerbate asthma, sometimes fatally.

Ibuprofen appears to have the lowest incidence of digestive adverse drug reactions of all the nonselective NSAIDs. However, this holds true only at lower doses of ibuprofen, so over-the-counter (OTC) preparations of ibuprofen are, in general, labeled to advise a maximum daily dose of 1,200 mg.

Ibuprofen may be quantitated in blood, plasma, or serum to demonstrate the presence of the drug in a person having experienced an anaphylactic reaction, confirm a diagnosis of poisoning in hospitalized patients, or assist in a medicolegal death investigation. A nomogram relating ibuprofen plasma concentration, time since ingestion, and risk of developing renal toxicity in overdose patients has been published.

Mechanism of action

Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as ibuprofen work by inhibiting the enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX), which converts arachidonic acid to prostaglandin H2 (PGH2). PGH2, in turn, is converted by other enzymes to several other prostaglandins (which are mediators of pain, inflammation, and fever) and to thromboxane A2 (which stimulates platelet aggregation, leading to the formation of blood clots).

Like acetaminophen and indomethacin,[citation needed] ibuprofen is a nonselective COX inhibitor, in that it inhibits two isoforms of cyclooxygenase, COX-1 and COX-2. The analgesic, antipyretic, and anti-inflammatory activity of NSAIDs appears to operate mainly through inhibition of COX-2, whereas inhibition of COX-1 would be responsible for unwanted effects on the gastrointestinal tract. However, the role of the individual COX isoforms in the analgesic, anti-inflammatory, and gastric damage effects of NSAIDs is uncertain and different compounds cause different degrees of analgesia and gastric damage.

To achieve the beneficial effects of ibuprofen and other NSAIDs without gastrointestinal ulceration and bleeding, selective COX-2 inhibitors were developed to inhibit the COX-2 isoform without inhibition of COX-1.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Ibuprofen, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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