Omeprazole

 
4.7 (1)
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What is/are Omeprazole?

Omeprazole (INN) /oʊˈmɛprəzoʊl/ (Prilosec and generics) is a proton pump inhibitor used in the treatment of dyspepsia, peptic ulcer disease (PUD), gastroesophageal reflux disease (GORD/GERD), laryngopharyngeal reflux (LPR) and Zollinger–Ellison syndrome. Omeprazole is one of the most widely prescribed drugs internationally and is available over the counter in some countries.

Medical uses

Omeprazole is used to treat gastroesophageal reflux disease, gastric and duodenum ulceration, and gastritis.
As a therapeutic adjuvant in treating Helicobacter pylori related ulcers Omeprazole is combined with the antibiotics clarithromycin and amoxicillin (or metronidazole in penicillin-hypersensitive patients) in the 7–14 day eradication triple therapy for Helicobacter pylori. Infection by H. pylori is the causative factor in the majority of peptic ulcers.

Adverse effects

Some of the most frequent side effects of omeprazole (experienced by over 1% of those taking the drug) are headache, diarrhea, abdominal pain, nausea, dizziness, trouble awakening and sleep deprivation, although in clinical trials the incidence of these effects with omeprazole was mostly comparable to that found with placebo. Other side effects may include iron and vitamin B12 deficiency, although there is very little evidence to support this.

Proton pump inhibitors may be associated with a greater risk of osteoporosis related fractures and Clostridium difficile-associated diarrhea. By suppressing acid-mediated breakdown of proteins, antacid preparations (such as omeprazole) lead to an elevated risk of developing food and drug allergies. This happens due to undigested proteins then passing into the gastrointestinal tract where sensitisation occurs. It is unclear whether this risk occurs with only long-term use or with short-term use as well. Patients are frequently administered the drugs in intensive care as a protective measure against ulcers, but this use is also associated with a 30% increase in occurrence of pneumonia. The risk of community-acquired pneumonia may also be higher in people taking PPIs.

Since their introduction, proton pump inhibitors (especially omeprazole) have been associated with several cases of acute tubulointerstitial nephritis, an inflammation of the kidneys that often occurs as an adverse drug reaction. PPI use has also been associated with fundic gland polyposis.

The following adverse reactions have been identified during post-approval use of Prilosec Delayed-Release Capsules. Because these reactions are voluntarily reported from a population of uncertain size, it is not always possible to reliably estimate their actual frequency or establish a causal relationship to drug exposure.

Systemic: Hypersensitivity reactions including anaphylaxis, anaphylactic shock, angioedema, bronchospasm, interstitial nephritis, urticaria, fever; pain; fatigue; malaise;hair loss; Cardiovascular: Chest pain or angina, tachycardia, bradycardia, palpitations, elevated blood pressure, peripheral edema

Endocrine: Gynecomastia

Gastrointestinal: Pancreatitis (some fatal), anorexia, irritable colon, fecal discoloration, esophageal candidiasis, mucosal atrophy of the tongue, stomatitis, abdominal swelling, dry mouth, microscopic colitis. During treatment with omeprazole, gastric fundic gland polyps have been noted rarely. These polyps are benign and appear to be reversible when treatment is discontinued. Gastroduodenal carcinoids have been reported in patients with ZE syndrome on long-term treatment with Prilosec. This finding is believed to be a manifestation of the underlying condition, which is known to be associated with such tumors.

Hepatic: Liver disease including hepatic failure (some fatal), liver necrosis (some fatal), hepatic encephalopathy hepatocellular disease, cholestatic disease, mixed hepatitis, jaundice, and elevations of liver function tests [ALT, AST, GGT, alkaline phosphatase, and bilirubin] Metabolism and Nutritional disorders: Hypoglycemia, hypomagnesemia, hyponatremia, weight gain  Musculoskeletal: Muscle weakness, myalgia, muscle cramps, joint pain, leg pain, bone fracture

Nervous System/Psychiatric: Psychiatric and sleep disturbances including depression, agitation, aggression, hallucinations, confusion, insomnia, nervousness, apathy, somnolence, anxiety, and dream abnormalities; tremors, paresthesia; vertigo

Respiratory: Epistaxis, pharyngeal pain

Skin: Severe generalized skin reactions including toxic epidermal necrolysis (some fatal), Stevens-Johnson syndrome, and erythema multiforme; photosensitivity; urticaria; rash; skin inflammation; pruritus; petechiae; purpura; alopecia; dry skin; hyperhidrosis

Special Senses: Tinnitus, taste perversion

Ocular: Optic atrophy, anterior ischemic optic neuropathy, optic neuritis, dry eye syndrome, ocular irritation, blurred vision, double vision

Urogenital: Interstitial nephritis, hematuria, proteinuria, elevated serum creatinine, microscopic pyuria, urinary tract infection, glycosuria, urinary frequency, testicular pain

Hematologic: Agranulocytosis (some fatal), hemolytic anemia, pancytopenia, neutropenia, anemia, thrombocytopenia, leukopenia, leucocytosis.

Mechanism of action

Omeprazole is a selective and irreversible proton pump inhibitor. Omeprazole suppresses gastric acid secretion by specific inhibition of the hydrogen–potassium adenosinetriphosphatase (H +, K +-ATPase) enzyme system found at the secretory surface of parietal cells. It inhibits the final transport of hydrogen ions (via exchange with potassium ions) into the gastric lumen. Since the H +, K +-ATPase enzyme system is regarded as the acid (proton) pump of the gastric mucosa, omeprazole is known as a gastric acid pump inhibitor. The inhibitory effect is dose-related. Omeprazole inhibits both basal and stimulated acid secretion irrespective of the stimulus.

This article uses material from the Wikipedia article Omeprazole, which is released under the Creative Commons Attribution-Share-Alike License 3.0.

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This page uses publicly available data from the U.S. National Library of Medicine (NLM), National Institutes of Health, Department of Health and Human Services; NLM is not responsible for the page and product and does not endorse or recommend this or any other product.

Reviews for Omeprazole

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1 reviews

Overall rating
 
4.7
Overall satisfaction
 
5.0(1)
Efficacy
 
4.0(1)
Lack of side effects
 
5.0(1)
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Overall rating
 
4.7
Overall satisfaction
 
5.0
Efficacy
 
4.0
Lack of side effects
 
5.0
OTC for acid reflux

Peptic ulcers resolved but acid reflux persisted...... so I continued to take this med.
Without it, I am constantly feeling "heartburn" and needing to pop a Tums.
Prilosec is in the Proton Pump Inhibitor class.
I take it once per day and I find it to be effective.
I also think I have less problems with asthma, since getting this reflux problem under control.

Relevant Brand Name and Medical Condition

Brand Name
Prilosec
Medical Condition
Duodenal Ulcer

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